The knowledge hub for better peacebuilding
×
×
Back
×
Back
×
Back
×
Back
×
Back
×
Back

Public event

"When Swallows Cry" Theatre Piece

Events

When Swallows Cry - Theatre Piece

Auditorium, Maison de la Paix

Tuesday 6 November, 19:00 - 20:30

Join us for the award-winning When Swallows Cry commissioned by Ibsen International, a Norwegian company, in 2016 as a part of a project to produce new plays on the global theme of migration and refugees. 

It premiered at the Market Theatre, Johannesburg in January 2017 where it played to critical acclaim and sold-out houses.  In June 2018, it was awarded three of the major prizes for theatre in South Africa’s main province, Gauteng: Best Director, Best Script and Best Production with all three actors also having been nominated in the Best Actor category.

 

When Swallows Cry interweaves three stories about the mobility of Africans in our contemporary world, with three actors each playing contrasting characters in the three different playlets, with one story set in Australia, another in the USA and the third in Africa.

Written by: Mike van Graan

Directed by: Lesedi Job

Featuring: Warren Masemola, Christiaan Schoombie and Mpho Osei-Tutu

This performance is free to attend, but places are limited, so make sure you register today!

Please note, we will also be showing another play of Mike Van Graan titled Human Frights on Monday 5 November at 19:30.

Why Theatre?

The fault-lines inequality and culture are important contributing factors to a turbulent world. Inequality in economic, political, military and cultural power fuels conflicts at local, national, regional and international levels; while different value and belief systems, different ways of understanding the world and of making personal and group meanings within the world, further texture such conflicts.

To build sustainable peace, it is necessary to understand and mitigate the cultural dimensions of conflicts. Theatre is an important tool for the following reasons:

- Theatre presents human stories that impact an audience not only intellectually, but also emotionally and psychologically, emphasising the humanity and human bonds within our polarised world

- Through satire and the use of humour, uncomfortable messages may be conveyed in less alienating forms, inviting audiences to reflect on the provocations less defensively

- Theatre by itself cannot change the world, but it can help to change individual perspectives by present conflicting viewpoints and thus catalyse conversations and actions that contribute to change

Share
Print