International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

Humanitarian work in times of armed conflict and other situations of armed violence. Specific sections on: aid for civilians and prisoners, reuniting families, tracing missing persons, spreading knowledge of humanitarian law. It maintains relations with States, non-state parties to an armed conflict, the international community, the private sector and individual beneficiaries of humanitarian assistance, all in cooperation with the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. Protection of the rights of individuals affected by armed conflict and other situations of violence, in accordance with different bodies of law and the relevant practices and customs, to preserve the safety, integrity and dignity of persons; Humanitarian assistance; Promoting IHL, including its development, dissemination and monitoring of compliance; Reducing the risks and effects of weapon contamination; Multilateral diplomacy and humanitarian coordination; Private sector relations; Cooperation with National Societies and the International Federation.

(ICRC Mission Statement) The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is an impartial, neutral and independent organization whose exclusively humanitarian mission is to protect the lives and dignity of victims of armed conflict and other situations of armed violence and to provide them with assistance. The ICRC also endeavours to prevent suffering by promoting and strengthening humanitarian law and universal humanitarian principles. Established in 1863, the ICRC is at the origin of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. It directs and coordinates the international activities conducted by the Movement in armed conflicts and other situations of violence.

  • Civilian Small Arms Control
  • Corrections
  • DDR
  • Defence Institutions
  • Employment Generation
  • Gender
  • Humanitarian Assistance
  • Humanitarian Protection
  • Judicial and Legal Reform
  • Law Enforcement Institutions
  • Mine Action
  • Promotion of international humanitarian law
  • Transitional Justice

Humanitarian Protection

The ICRC's mandate is rooted in international humanitarian law and the Statutes of the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement. In order to preserve the lives, security, dignity and physical and mental well-being of people adversely affected by armed conflict and other situations of violence, the ICRC has adopted a protection approach that aims to ensure that the authorities and other players involved fulfil their obligations and uphold the rights of individuals protected by law. A unique mandate and track record when it comes to monitoring the living conditions and treatment of hundreds of thousands of persons detained in connection with situations of armed conflict and other situations of violence; Decades of experience in most of the areas of humanitarian protection and assistance mentioned, with the presence of qualified staff in practically all the main countries and areas affected by armed conflict and other situations of violence. The ICRC also acts as a neutral intermediary between the parties to armed conflict As far as the restoration of family contacts is concerned, the ICRC can count on the support of the worldwide network of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.
Between 100 million to 300 million CHF per annum
  • Direct project implementation
  • Project support services
Description of activities
One example is ICRC's visits to prisoners of war, civilian internees and those held in situations of internal violence to verify whether they are being treated according to relevant international standards. Regular visits enable the ICRC to track prisoners' whereabouts and make recommendations to the authorities about any improvements to conditions that may be necessary.
In the event of conflict, the ICRC maintains as much proximity and contact with the civilian population as possible. It makes representations to the relevant authorities to prevent or put an end to violations of humanitarian law, and to protect the life, health and dignity of civilians and to ensure that the consequences of the conflict do not jeopardize their future.

Humanitarian Assistance

The ICRC's mandate is rooted in international humanitarian law and the Statutes of the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement. The aim of assistance is to preserve life and/or restore the dignity of individuals or communities adversely affected by an armed conflict or other situation of violence. Assistance activities address the consequences of violations of IHL and other bodies of law that protect people. Assistance programmes are designed to preserve or restore acceptable living conditions for people affected by armed conflict or other situations of violence, to enable them to maintain an adequate standard of living in their respective social and cultural context until their basic needs are met by the authorities or through their own means. Decades of experience in most of the areas of humanitarian protection and assistance mentioned, with the presence of qualified staff in practically all the main countries and areas affected by armed conflict and other situations of violence; As far as the restoration of family contacts is concerned, the ICRC can count on the support of the worldwide network of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies; Legal, technical and forensic experience is required to assist the elucidation of the fate of persons unaccounted for because of armed conflict, and to support their families.
More than 300 million CHF per annum
  • Capacity and development training
  • Direct project implementation
  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Policy advice
  • Research and policy development
  • Technical assistance
Description of activities
structural interventions: to protect livelihoods by influencing processes, institutions and policies that have a direct impact on a target population’s capacity to maintain its livelihood over time (such as agricultural or livestock services).
Provision of goods and/or services essential to the survival of persons in need; ensure access to water and safe environmental sanitation conditions, and promotes basic health care by taking emergency action and supporting existing facilities; implementing activities, supporting existing structures, organizations and programmes or mobilizing others in order to foster access to health care, especially in the following key areas: health in detention, pre-hospital care (first aid and medical evacuations), emergency hospital care, hospital management, basic health care, mother and child care and support for victims of sexual violence; manufacturing prosthetic/orthotic appliances and components.
Monitoring possible violations of IHL / Monitoring the fate of persons unaccounted for.
developing guidelines, manuals and publications to empower investigations into cases of missing persons; providing policy guidance and technical support on weapon contamination issues to National Societies and representing the Movement internationally on these matters.
developing tools, including for the collection and management of information.
Providing training and advice on best practices in the forensic sciences as they relate to the search for the missing, including in natural disasters.

Promotion of international humanitarian law

The ICRC's approach to prevention has a medium- to long-term outlook and aims to prevent suffering by influencing those who have a direct or indirect impact on the fate of people affected by such situations, and/or who can influence the ICRC’s ability to gain access to these persons and operate efficiently in their favour.
Between 100 million to 300 million CHF per annum
  • Advocacy
  • Capacity and development training
  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Policy advice
  • Research and policy development
  • Technical assistance
Description of activities
promoting humanitarian treaties among the relevant authorities by making representations to governments, providing training in IHL and drafting technical documents and guidelines to further national implementation.
monitoring new developments, carrying out studies, organizing meetings of experts and drafting proposals.
encouraging and helping authorities to integrate IHL into the doctrine, education and training of national armed, police and security forces, and into the training and education programmes for future leaders and opinion-makers in universities and schools.
taking part in meetings of experts and diplomatic conferences held to develop new treaties or other legal instruments, and formulating bilateral and multilateral initiatives to promote their acceptance by governments and relevant organizations.
providing technical advice and support for the implementation of IHL, undertaking studies and carrying out technical assessments of the compatibility of national legislation with this body of law.
  • Africa
    • Central Africa
      • Angola
      • Cameroon
      • Democratic Republic of the Congo
      • Chad
      • Equatorial Guinea
      • Central African Republic
      • Gabon
      • Sao Tome and Principe
    • Eastern Africa
      • Madagascar
      • Mauritius
      • Uganda
      • Mozambique
      • Kenya
      • Somalia
      • Sudan
      • Burundi
      • Rwanda
      • United Republic of Tanzania
      • Ethiopia
      • Eritrea
      • Zambia
      • Malawi
      • Djibouti
      • Comoros
      • Seychelles
      • Zimbabwe
    • Northern Africa
      • Egypt
      • Morocco
      • Western Sahara
      • Algeria
      • Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
      • Tunisia
    • Southern Africa
      • South Africa
      • Swaziland
      • Lesotho
      • Botswana
      • Namibia
    • Western Africa
      • Benin
      • Gambia
      • Ghana
      • Senegal
      • Togo
      • Nigeria
      • Liberia
      • Mauritania
      • Niger
      • Sierra Leone
      • Guinea
      • Burkina Faso
      • Cape Verde
      • Cote d’Ivoire
      • Guinea-Bissau
      • Mali
  • Americas
    • Caribbean
      • Haiti
      • Dominican Republic
      • Jamaica
      • Antigua and Barbuda
      • Bahamas
      • Barbados
      • Cuba
      • Dominica
      • Grenada
      • Saint Kitts and Nevis
      • Saint Lucia
      • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
      • Trinidad and Tobago
    • Central America
      • Costa Rica
      • Honduras
      • Panama
      • El-Salvador
      • Guatemala
      • Nicaragua
      • Belize
    • North America
      • Mexico
      • United States of America
      • Canada
    • South America
      • Argentina
      • Brazil
      • Chile
      • Paraguay
      • Uruguay
      • Bolivia
      • Colombia
      • Ecuador
      • Peru
      • Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)
      • French Guiana
      • Guyana
      • Suriname
  • Asia
    • Central Asia
      • Kazakhstan
      • Kyrgyzstan
      • Tajikistan
      • Uzbekistan
      • Turkmenistan
    • East Asia
      • Mongolia
      • Republic of Korea
      • China
      • Japan
      • Republic of China (Taiwan)
      • Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
    • South Asia
      • Maldives
      • Nepal
      • Afghanistan
      • India
      • Pakistan
      • Sri Lanka
      • Bangladesh
      • Iran (Islamic Republic of)
      • Bhutan
    • South East Asia
      • Cambodia
      • Indonesia
      • Philippines
      • Thailand
      • Myanmar
      • Singapore
      • Lao People’s Democratic Republic
      • Timor-Leste
      • Brunei Darussalam
      • Viet Nam
      • Malaysia
    • Western Asia
      • Armenia
      • Bahrain
      • Georgia
      • Jordan
      • Lebanon
      • Turkey
      • Yemen
      • Azerbaijan
      • Iraq
      • Israel
      • Palestine
      • Cyprus
      • Oman
      • Qatar
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Syrian Arab Republic
      • United Arab Emirates
      • Kuwait
  • Europe
    • Eastern Europe
      • Republic of Moldova
      • Romania
      • Czech Republic
      • Slovakia
      • Kosovo
      • Russian Federation
      • Ukraine
      • Poland
      • Belarus
      • Bulgaria
      • Hungary
    • Western Europe
      • France
      • Switzerland
      • Belgium
    • Southern Europe
      • Montenegro
      • Albania
      • Bosnia and Herzegovina
      • Croatia
      • Serbia
      • (The former Yugoslav) Republic of Macedonia
  • Oceania

Guinea Bissau

Sectors of activity: 
Law Enforcement Institutions
Defence Institutions
Humanitarian Protection
Humanitarian Assistance
Employment Generation
Types of activity: 
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Description: 

In Guinea-Bissau the ICRC visits detainees and raises awareness of IHL among political authorities and armed forces. The ICRC also assists residents and refugees in Casamance by providing access to clean drinking water and sanitation as well as helping to restart some local economic activities.

Burundi

Sectors of activity: 
Law Enforcement Institutions
Defence Institutions
Supports IHL training for security forces
Transitional Justice
Judicial and Legal Reform
Corrections
Humanitarian Protection
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Description: 

In Burundi, the ICRC works with the prison authorities to ensure that detainees are treated according to internationally recognized standards. It rehabilitates water and sanitation systems for vulnerable groups. It reunites children separated from their parents with their families and restores family links. It also supports training in IHL for the armed and security forces.

Sierra Leone

Sectors of activity: 
Law Enforcement Institutions
Defence Institutions
Supports IHL training for security forces
Judicial and Legal Reform
Humanitarian Protection
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Capacity and development training
Description: 

The ICRC is providing protection for victims of conflict, restoring family links and visiting detainees. It is developing Sierra Leonean capacity of IHL, supporting the translation of IHL into national legislation and disseminating IHL to armed and security forces. ICRC is also supporting reform of penitentiary administration.

Central African Republic

Sectors of activity: 
Law Enforcement Institutions
Defence Institutions
Humanitarian Assistance
Humanitarian Protection
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Capacity and development training
Description: 

The ICRC opened a delegation in the Central African Republic (CAR) in 2007 in the context of the non-international armed conflict in the north of the country, but has carried out activities in the CAR since 1983. It protects and assists people affected by armed conflict or other situations of violence, providing emergency aid, carrying out livelihood-support projects and rehabilitating water and sanitation facilities. It also visits detainees, restores family links for people separated by conflict, promotes IHL among the authorities, armed forces, armed groups and academic institutions, and supports the development of the Central African Red Cross Society.

Guinea Bissau

Sectors of activity: 
Law Enforcement Institutions
Defence Institutions
Humanitarian Protection
Humanitarian Assistance
Employment Generation
Types of activity: 
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Description: 

In Guinea-Bissau the ICRC visits detainees and raises awareness of IHL among political authorities and armed forces. The ICRC also assists residents and refugees in Casamance by providing access to clean drinking water and sanitation as well as helping to restart some local economic activities.

Guinea Bissau

Sectors of activity: 
Law Enforcement Institutions
Defence Institutions
Humanitarian Protection
Humanitarian Assistance
Employment Generation
Types of activity: 
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Description: 

In Guinea-Bissau the ICRC visits detainees and raises awareness of IHL among political authorities and armed forces. The ICRC also assists residents and refugees in Casamance by providing access to clean drinking water and sanitation as well as helping to restart some local economic activities.

Burundi

Sectors of activity: 
Law Enforcement Institutions
Defence Institutions
Supports IHL training for security forces
Transitional Justice
Judicial and Legal Reform
Corrections
Humanitarian Protection
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Description: 

In Burundi, the ICRC works with the prison authorities to ensure that detainees are treated according to internationally recognized standards. It rehabilitates water and sanitation systems for vulnerable groups. It reunites children separated from their parents with their families and restores family links. It also supports training in IHL for the armed and security forces.

Sierra Leone

Sectors of activity: 
Law Enforcement Institutions
Defence Institutions
Supports IHL training for security forces
Judicial and Legal Reform
Humanitarian Protection
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Capacity and development training
Description: 

The ICRC is providing protection for victims of conflict, restoring family links and visiting detainees. It is developing Sierra Leonean capacity of IHL, supporting the translation of IHL into national legislation and disseminating IHL to armed and security forces. ICRC is also supporting reform of penitentiary administration.

Central African Republic

Sectors of activity: 
Law Enforcement Institutions
Defence Institutions
Humanitarian Assistance
Humanitarian Protection
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Capacity and development training
Description: 

The ICRC opened a delegation in the Central African Republic (CAR) in 2007 in the context of the non-international armed conflict in the north of the country, but has carried out activities in the CAR since 1983. It protects and assists people affected by armed conflict or other situations of violence, providing emergency aid, carrying out livelihood-support projects and rehabilitating water and sanitation facilities. It also visits detainees, restores family links for people separated by conflict, promotes IHL among the authorities, armed forces, armed groups and academic institutions, and supports the development of the Central African Red Cross Society.

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
Avenue de la Paix 19
Geneva CH-1202
Other
More than 10 years (The ICRC was established in 1863)
Other
13,200 (Approximately, as of 2009)
Avenue de la Paix 19
Geneva CH-1202
Headquarters

Management of field operations in four core activities: protection, assistance, prevention and cooperation within the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, Humanitarian Diplomacy, Governance, Legal services, Human Resources, Administration, Fundraising, Documentation, Archives, etc.

800 (Approximately)
Dr
Jakob Kellenberger
President
Mrs. Cristina Pellandini
Diplomatic Advisor

Network

International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

Geographical scope: 
Geneva
Description: 

The ICRC works with the other components of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. The aim of cooperation is to increase the operational capabilities of the National Societies, above all in countries affected or likely to be affected by armed conflict or other situations of violence. It further aims to increase the ICRC’s ability to interact with National Societies and work in partnership with them. The cooperation approach aims to optimize the Movement’s humanitarian work by making the best use of complementary mandates and skills in operational matters such as protection, assistance and prevention. It involves drawing up and implementing the policies of the Movement that are adopted during its statutory meetings and building the capacities of the National Societies, helping them to adhere at all times to the Fundamental Principles. The ICRC shares its expertise with the National Societies in their domestic and international activities. It does this by: strengthening both the National Societies’ capacity to take action and provide appropriate services in times of armed conflict and other situations of violence in their own country and the ICRC’s action and operational capacity through its interaction and partnership with National Societies promoting operational partnerships with National Societies in their own countries and with those working internationally in order to respond to the needs of people affected by conflicts or other situations of violence promoting dialogue and having regular communication on issues of common concern with National Societies and the International Federation Secretariat.

Steering Committee for Humanitarian Response

Description: 

The ICRC is a member of the Steering Committee for Humanitarian Response (SCHR). The SCHR's mission is to bring together the major international humanitarian networks with common values to make this vision reality. SCHR members pool experience and use their collective weight to carry out effective humanitarian action by: sharing relevant information among member agencies and fostering cooperation at all levels; highlighting issues of humanitarian concern and, where possible, adopting common positions; establishing working groups to study in depth relevant humanitarian issues and policies, especially on standards, accountability, security and protection; engaging, where possible, in joint advocacy on humanitarian issues and situations; engaging with the UN humanitarian system, and actively participating in the Inter Agency Standing Committee (IASC); playing a leading role in ongoing debates about humanitarian standards; conducting peer reviews to learn from one another and improve our humanitarian response; regularly bringing the principals of our members together to build trust leading to further synergies at all levels of our work.

United Nations agencies

Type: 
United Nations / IOs
Geographical scope: 
Geneva
Description: 

The ICRC follows the work of UN bodies in New York and Geneva such as the General Assembly, the Security Council, the Department of Peacekeeping Operations, the
Peacebuilding Commission, the Human Rights Council, the Economic and Social Council and the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, offering its expertise on matters related to IHL and issues of humanitarian concern. It also engages in regular exchanges with the various UN and non-UN humanitarian agencies.

The ICRC actively participates in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC), in its capacity as standing invitee. It played an active role in the IASC’s main meetings, working groups, information meetings and sub-groups, such as the IASC Informal Group on Humanitarian Space. ICRC field delegations attended coordination meetings and cooperated with UN staff to develop Common Humanitarian Action Plans in an effort to prevent duplication or gaps in relief aid.

Without name

Type: 
Other
Other: 
Regional and multilateral fora

Partnership

International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

Description: 

The aim of cooperation is to increase the operational capabilities of the National Societies, above all in countries affected or likely to be affected by armed conflict or other situations of violence. It further aims to increase the ICRC’s ability to interact with
National Societies and work in partnership with them. The cooperation approach aims to optimize the Movement’s humanitarian work by making the best use of complementary mandates and skills in operational matters such as protection, assistance and prevention. It involves drawing up and implementing the policies of the Movement that are adopted during its statutory meetings and building the capacities of the National Societies, helping them to adhere at all times to the Fundamental Principles. The ICRC shares its expertise with the National Societies in their domestic and international activities. It does this by: strengthening both the National Societies’ capacity to take action and provide appropriate services in times of armed conflict and other situations of violence in their own country and the ICRC’s action and operational capacity through its interaction and partnership with National Societies promoting operational partnerships with National Societies in their own countries and with those working internationally in order to respond to the needs of people affected by conflicts or other situations of violence promoting dialogue and having regular communication on issues of common concern with National Societies and the International Federation Secretariat.

Other humanitarian operational actors.

Description: 

The ICRC coordinates its activities in the field with other reality based, action-oriented humanitarian actors. It coordinates humanitarian operations in the field through its delegations with UN country teams and NGOs. The ICRC will continue its practical coordination with a broad range of UN and non-UN actors, independently of the "label" attributed to the venue (whether cluster, UNCT or IASC in-Country Team meeting). While emphasising its independence, the ICRC is currently exploring new ways of extending its cooperation with other humanitarian actors.