International Labour Organization (ILO)

As the world's only tripartite multilateral agency, the ILO is dedicated to bringing decent work and livelihoods, job-related security and better living standards to the people of both poor and rich countries. It helps to attain those goals by promoting rights at work, encouraging opportunities for decent employment, enhancing social protection and strengthening dialogue on work-related issues. The ILO is the international meeting place for the world of work. We are the experts on work and employment and particularly on the critical role that these issues play in bringing about economic development and progress. At the heart of our mission is helping countries build the institutions that are the bulwarks of democracy and to help them become accountable to the people. The ILO formulates international labour standards in the form of Conventions and Recommendations setting minimum standards of basic labour rights: freedom of association, the right to organize, collective bargaining, abolition of forced labour, equality of opportunity and treatment and other standards addressing conditions across the entire spectrum of work-related issues. The ILO's diverse tasks are grouped under four strategic objectives: 1) Promote and realize standards and fundamental principles and rights at work, 2) Create greater opportunities for women and men to secure decent employment and income, 3) Enhance the coverage and effectiveness of social protection for all; 4) Strengthen tripartism and social dialogue.

The International Labour Organization (ILO) is devoted to advancing opportunities for women and men to obtain decent and productive work in conditions of freedom, equity, security and human dignity. Its main aims are to promote rights at work, encourage decent employment opportunities, enhance social protection and strengthen dialogue in handling work-related issues. In promoting social justice and internationally recognized human and labour rights, the organization continues to pursue its founding mission that labour peace is essential to prosperity. Today, the ILO helps advance the creation of decent jobs and the kinds of economic and working conditions that give working people and business people a stake in lasting peace, prosperity and progress.

  • Assisting Social Security mechanisms
  • Coordination of International Assistance
  • DDR
  • Economic Foundations for Growth and Development
  • Employment Generation
  • Gender
  • Physical Infrastructure and Reconstruction
  • Public Administration and Government Strengthening

Employment Generation

Employment generation itself has been a weak point in the current UN-System-wide peacebuilding initative. The ILO brings its knowledge and experience from its long-term engagement in employment generation activities.
  • Capacity and development training
  • Direct project implementation
  • Policy advice
  • Project support services
  • Research and policy development
  • Technical assistance
Description of activities
Skills and knowledge are the engines of economic growth and social development. The ILO's Skills and Employability Department (EMP/SKILLS) assists individuals to become employable through training, skills development and education. This assistance is crucial to improve and sustain their productivity and income-earning opportunities at work. It serves to enhance their mobility in the labour market and offer the potential for increased career choices. By investing in their human resources, enterprises are able to improve productivity and compete more successfully in increasingly integrated world economies. EMP/SKILLS seeks to promote greater investment in skills and training so that men and women have enhanced and equal access to productive and decent work. Through the vehicles of advocacy, knowledge development and services to ILO constituents, EMP/SKILLS promotes the improvement of training policies and programmes world-wide, with special emphasis on training strategies that support the integration of groups that may be disadvantaged in the labour market. / Global.
Since 1999, the CRISIS programme has engaged in technical cooperation in Africa, Latin America, Asia, and Europe. But even with its worldwide scope, the programme believes in locally tailored solutions. Successful prevention requires knowledge of specific vulnerabilities and preparedness gaps. By the same token, post-crisis interventions require an understanding of the disaster’s precise effects on local opportunities for decent work. By studying the conditions, the programme and its partners can implement projects in the most appropriate technical areas, targeting the hardest-hit groups. / Global.
Since 1999, the CRISIS programme has engaged in technical cooperation in Africa, Latin America, Asia, and Europe. But even with its worldwide scope, the programme believes in locally tailored solutions. Successful prevention requires knowledge of specific vulnerabilities and preparedness gaps. By the same token, post-crisis interventions require an understanding of the disaster’s precise effects on local opportunities for decent work. By studying the conditions, the programme and its partners can implement projects in the most appropriate technical areas, targeting the hardest-hit groups. / Global In 2008, ILO, together with UNDP, completed the drafting of the UN Policy on Post-conflict Employment Creation, Income Generation and Reintegration. About 19 UN agencies were involved in the process. In 2009, ILO is going to host a joint team to roll out the UN Policy in four conflict-affected countries.
Since 1999, the CRISIS programme has engaged in technical cooperation in Africa, Latin America, Asia, and Europe. But even with its worldwide scope, the programme believes in locally tailored solutions. Successful prevention requires knowledge of specific vulnerabilities and preparedness gaps. By the same token, post-crisis interventions require an understanding of the disaster’s precise effects on local opportunities for decent work. By studying the conditions, the programme and its partners can implement projects in the most appropriate technical areas, targeting the hardest-hit groups.
The basic references for the work of the Employment Analysis Research Unit are ILO convention 122 on the promotion of full, productive and freely chosen employment, the Global Employment Agenda and Decent Work: The general objective is to contribute, by good quality analysis and research, to the overall ILO goal of the promotion of full, productive and freely chosen employment • By developing cutting edge research in its areas of core competencies –labour market and employment policy, macroeconomic policy, development policy, trade and investment and poverty and employment • By contributing to the conceptualisation and implementation of the Global Employment agenda and the Decent Work agenda • By underpinning the advisory work of EMP/POL through applied research • By contributing to EMP/PRODUCTS major publication, the "World employment report". EMP/ANALYSIS unites two major economic disciplines: development economics and labour economics, but is open to other disciplines as well (e.g. labour law, sociology, management studies) and promotes an open and interdisciplinary research approach as required for research that takes into consideration the four strategic objectives of the ILO. Its research and analysis activities are problem driven and focus on areas like insufficient levels and quality of employment, unemployment and underemployment, exclusion and poverty, insufficient growth and low productivity and deficient economic and social development in general. More specifically, research work aims at tracking the development of labour markets and the factors influencing these developments as well as keeping abreast with the developments of policies that aim at correcting market or policy failures. These research findings are the basis for alternative policy proposals, which ultimately should contribute to: • Integrating employment into development policies • Creating a more employment friendly policy environment that supports the creation of decent work by the private and public sector. • Facilitating the acceptance and implementation of economic change while ensuring worker’s protection It contributes to the Global Employment Agenda’s goal of putting productive employment in the centre of development and poverty reduction policies, both theoretically and empirically. It assumes that the reduction of the decent work deficit is not only feasible but is a major means for poverty reduction and development. Another assumption is that established trade-offs (for example, between income equality and growth, between productivity and employment, between the quality and the quantity of work) should and can be overcome. It uses proven quantitative and qualitative research methods and has access to the main data sources: it cooperates also with other international organisations and has established an important network of collaboration with many leading research centres and experts in the field of its competencies. / Global In 2009, ILO launched a new project to develop the ILO Guidelines on post-conflict private sector development.
LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - a participatory development process to create decent jobs and stimulating economic activity Local economic development (LED) is a practical concept to strengthen the economic capacity of a locality to improve its future and the quality of life for all. It focuses on local competitive advantages and provides communities with the means to identify new opportunities to create jobs and income. LED is practiced by communities and cities around the world, in developed as well as in developing countries. They turn increasingly to LED strategies as a response to the challenges posed by globalization and the widespread move to decentralization. The ILO promotes LED to pursue the goal of decent employment for all. The organisation's social partners increasingly reflect LED initiatives in the Decent Work Country Programmes, which are designed by governments, workers’ and employers’ organizations for individual countries. The ILO has longstanding expertise in assisting its constituents in developing and implementing LED strategies. Its main fields of assistance are research, training, knowledge sharing, and technical cooperation projects, which are involved in a wide range of economic, social and political settings. / Global Economic reintegration of ex-combatants – ILO provides technical assistance to design and implement economic reintegration of ex-combatants. Main areas of intervention in this area include the provision of advise to governments developing national framework on DDR, technical support for job placement and mapping out job opportunities, as well as business development training.

Economic Foundations for Growth and Development

Assisting Social Security mechanisms

  • Africa
    • Central Africa
      • Angola
      • Cameroon
      • Democratic Republic of the Congo
      • Chad
      • Equatorial Guinea
      • Central African Republic
      • Gabon
      • Sao Tome and Principe
    • Eastern Africa
      • Madagascar
      • Uganda
      • Mozambique
      • Kenya
      • Somalia
      • Sudan
      • Burundi
      • Rwanda
      • United Republic of Tanzania
      • Ethiopia
      • Eritrea
      • Zambia
      • Malawi
      • Djibouti
      • Comoros
      • Zimbabwe
    • Northern Africa
      • Egypt
      • Morocco
      • Algeria
      • Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
      • Tunisia
    • Southern Africa
      • South Africa
      • Swaziland
      • Lesotho
      • Botswana
      • Namibia
    • Western Africa
      • Benin
      • Gambia
      • Ghana
      • Senegal
      • Togo
      • Nigeria
      • Liberia
      • Sierra Leone
      • Guinea
      • Burkina Faso
      • Cape Verde
      • Cote d’Ivoire
      • Guinea-Bissau
      • Mali
  • Americas
    • Caribbean
      • Haiti
      • Dominican Republic
      • Jamaica
      • Bahamas
      • Cuba
      • Dominica
      • Trinidad and Tobago
    • Central America
      • Costa Rica
      • Honduras
      • Panama
      • El-Salvador
      • Guatemala
      • Nicaragua
      • Belize
    • North America
      • Mexico
      • United States of America
      • Canada
    • South America
      • Argentina
      • Brazil
      • Chile
      • Paraguay
      • Uruguay
      • Bolivia
      • Colombia
      • Ecuador
      • Peru
      • Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)
      • French Guiana
      • Guyana
      • Suriname
  • Asia
    • Central Asia
      • Kazakhstan
      • Kyrgyzstan
      • Tajikistan
      • Uzbekistan
      • Turkmenistan
    • East Asia
      • Mongolia
      • Republic of Korea
      • China
      • Japan
    • South Asia
      • Maldives
      • Nepal
      • Afghanistan
      • India
      • Pakistan
      • Sri Lanka
      • Bangladesh
      • Iran (Islamic Republic of)
    • South East Asia
      • Cambodia
      • Indonesia
      • Philippines
      • Thailand
      • Myanmar
      • Lao People’s Democratic Republic
      • Timor-Leste
      • Viet Nam
      • Malaysia
    • Western Asia
      • Armenia
      • Bahrain
      • Georgia
      • Jordan
      • Lebanon
      • Turkey
      • Yemen
      • Azerbaijan
      • Iraq
      • Israel
      • Palestine
      • Oman
      • Qatar
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Syrian Arab Republic
      • United Arab Emirates
      • Kuwait
  • Europe
    • Eastern Europe
      • Romania
      • Czech Republic
      • Slovakia
      • Russian Federation
      • Ukraine
      • Poland
      • Belarus
      • Bulgaria
      • Hungary
    • Northern Europe
      • Estonia
      • Latvia
      • Lithuania
      • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
      • Sweden
      • Denmark
      • Norway
      • Ireland
    • Western Europe
      • Austria
      • France
      • Liechtenstein
      • Switzerland
      • Belgium
      • Netherlands
      • Germany
      • Luxembourg
    • Southern Europe
      • Montenegro
      • Spain
      • Albania
      • Italy
      • Bosnia and Herzegovina
      • Croatia
      • Serbia
      • Greece
      • Portugal
      • Slovenia
      • (The former Yugoslav) Republic of Macedonia
  • Oceania

Sierra Leone

Sectors of activity: 
Employment Generation
Types of activity: 
Research and policy development
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Capacity and development training
Description: 

Youth employment

Burundi

Sectors of activity: 
DDR
Public Administration and Government Strengthening
Economic Foundations for Growth and Development
Coordination of International Assistance
Employment Generation
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Capacity and development training
Project support services

Sierra Leone

Sectors of activity: 
Employment Generation
Types of activity: 
Research and policy development
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Capacity and development training
Description: 

Youth employment

Burundi

Sectors of activity: 
DDR
Public Administration and Government Strengthening
Economic Foundations for Growth and Development
Coordination of International Assistance
Employment Generation
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Capacity and development training
Project support services
International Labour Organization (ILO)
Route des Morillons 4
Geneva 22 CH-1211
United Nations
2500
Route des Morillons 4
Geneva 22 CH-1211
Headquarters

NOTE: Number of Staff below is for the Crisis unit only. As for the Organization, the same as the questions above. The description below is specifically about the Crisis unit in Geneva. The ILO Crisis Response and Reconstruction Programme responds to the multifaceted challenges of crises through three integrated pillars: Country interventions to assist crisis-affected people and countries and to show how to apply ILO technical approaches. Strategic partnerships with other actors who work to prevent or respond to crises, including constituents, international agencies, and donors. Capacity building of ILO staff, ILO constituents, and others through targeted training and the development of crisis response knowledge and tools. These pillars reinforce each other. For example, ILO/CRISIS publications and capacity building pave the way for successful country interventions. Executing these, in turn, illuminates new potential partnerships. By organizing its work around the three pillars, ILO/CRISIS amplifies the impact of its efforts to promote decent work in crises.

15 - In Crisis Unit
Mr
Juan Somavia
Director-General
Donato Kiniger-Passigli
Senior Specialist - Strategic Partnerships and Crisis Response Coordination

Partnership

Inter-Agency Working Group on DDR

Type: 
Formal
Main purpose: 
Policy
Description: 

ILO is an active member of the Inter-Agency Working Group on DDR, which consists of 16 UN agencies and IOM. UNDP and DPKO chair the Working Group

Partner organisations: 
United Nations

The UN Working Group on Socieconomic Reintegration in Post-conflict Societies

Description: 

On 28 November 2006 the UN Secretary-General instructed the ILO and UNDP/Bureau for Crisis and Prevention and Recovery (BCPR) to co-lead an inter-agency task force to draft a UN System-wide policy paper on post-conflict employment creation, income generation and reintegration as well as an operational guidance note on the subject. There are 17 members in the task force; ADB, ESCWA, FAO, ILO, IMF, OHCHR, PBSO, SRSGCAC, UNCDF, DESA, UNDP, DPA, DPKO, UNHCR, UNICEF, UNIFEM, and WB.

Partner organisations: 
United Nations