United Nations Development Programme, Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery (UNDP/BCPR)

UNDP/BCPR provides expertise on crisis issues to UNDP country offices, regional bureaus, and headquarters. The work of the Bureau bridges the humanitarian phase of a post-crisis response and the long-term development phase following recovery. BCPR is also an advocate for crisis sensitivity, working to ensure that all UNDP's long-term development policies and programmes address the risks and opportunities related to disaster reduction and conflict prevention.

To enhance UNDP's efforts for sustainable development, working with partners to reduce the incidence and impact of disasters and violent conflicts, and to establish the solid foundations for peace and recovery from crisis, thereby advancing the UN Millennium Development Goals on poverty reduction.

Currently UNDP understands peace building on the ‘conceptual basis’ endorsed by the Policy Committee on May 22 2007. This is paraphrased in the most recent draft of the SG report as follows: ‘Peacebuilding involves a range of measures targeted to reduce the risk of lapsing or relapsing into conflict by strengthening national capacities at all levels for conflict management, and to lay the foundations for sustainable peace and development. It comprises a carefully prioritized, sequenced and therefore relatively narrow set of activities tailored to the specific needs of the country concerned, based on national ownership.

  • Civil Society
  • Civilian Small Arms Control
  • Community Conflict Resolution
  • Coordination of International Assistance
  • Corrections
  • DDR
  • Development of a Constitution
  • Economic Foundations for Growth and Development
  • Elections
  • Employment Generation
  • Financial Transparency and Accountability
  • Gender
  • Human Rights
  • Judicial and Legal Reform
  • Law Enforcement Institutions
  • Local Governance
  • Mine Action
  • Physical Infrastructure and Reconstruction
  • Political Parties
  • Public Administration and Government Strengthening
  • Security Sector Governance
  • Transitional Justice

DDR

UNDP has been a key actor in DDR since 1991, where it has managed and implemented DDR programmes in both peacekeeping and non-peace-keeping contexts. With field presence in 166 countries worldwide, UNDP has an understanding of socio-economic and political issues on the ground and is generally recognized as a trusted and impartial development actor. UNDP’s development perspective ensures that DDR programmes are designed within the context of recovery and development strategies. UNDP has the ability to mobilize and disburse resources rapidly using the well-established trust fund mechanism. The appointment of the UNDP Resident Representative as Humanitarian Coordinator/Resident Coordinator gives the organization a pivotal coordination role in the design and implementation of DDR programmes. UNDP has developed over the years a strong expertise and experience on DDR, small arms and Mine Action issues and is able to easily and quickly respond to request for support from affected countries. For more info, check: http://www.undp.org/bcpr/documents/ddr/_DDR_Practice_Note_English_PDF.pdf
  • Advocacy
  • Capacity and development training
  • Direct project implementation
  • Financial support
  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Policy advice
  • Project support services
  • Research and policy development
  • Technical assistance
Description of activities
Capacity development is one of the key activity supported by BCPR in its work. UNDP works with the IDDR Training Group to develop and implement training courses for DDR practitioners.
UNDP/BCPR does not engage in direct project execution; however support in the development of Project Initiation Plans is facilitated through BCPR. This includes preparatory assistance for CO efforts to establish a human and financial resource base to develop comprehensive DDR programming. This is the case in CAR and a few other priority countries.
UNDP/BCPR is funding DDR / small arms and mine action related projects through its Conflict Prevention and Recovery Thematic Trust Fund / worldwide.
UNDP/BCPR’s DDR Team is in the final stages of developing a M & E How to Guide for DDR. This guide will be introduced at the 1st joint Senior Managers Meeting for DDR in July 2009 with DPKO colleagues.
Aims to ensure that all UNDP DDR efforts at the Country Office level are IDDRS compliant. IDDRS compliant training is also ongoing to UNDP CO personnel, as well as government counterparts that includes National DDR Commissions
UNDP/BCPR supports project development and implementation primarily through regular field missions, technical assistance with planning and design and financial support. In addition to frequent project/country support missions over the past 2 years, UNDP/BCPR is also using the Express Roster to provide expert human resource SURGE capacities to Country Offices for DDR.
UNDP actively contributed to the development of the UN Integrated DDR Standards (IDDRS) working with 15 other UN agencies, programmes and IOM. UNDP has also produced a Practice Note on DDR. Recent policy development includes the development of additional IDDRS Modules which include DDR/Security Sector Reform, and DDR and Transitional Justice. These modules have been validated and are in their final stages of production. The IDDRS Reintegration Module and Youth Modules are being updated based on the outcomes of a 1st year IDDRS review. To understand the gender dimensions of drivers of self-inflicted, inter-personal and communal violence among ex-combatants, BCPR has commissioned a study on the Gender Dimensions of Violence in Crisis Contexts. It aims to increase understanding among UNDP personnel and their counterparts of the relevance of gender identities to violence in crisis settings, and enable them to develop effective response strategies to address issues in conflict prevention and recovery programmes. UNDP through BCPR is collaborating with DPKO on a 2nd Generation study for DDR.
Technical assistance to country offices includes CAR, Guinea Bissau, Burundi and Colombia as priority cases with ancillary work elsewhere. Advice includes development and guidance in programme development through fielding various missions including Scoping and Assessment Missions, as well as participating in integrated TAMs and joint missions with DPKO. Assistance in proposal development, budgeting, resource mobilization and constituting preparatory team remains ongoing.

Security Sector Governance

As a UN development agency, UNDP focuses on capacity development. Through its presence on the ground in all stages of crisis, UNDP can provide technical assistance in different forms, but always with an eye to the longer term development of institutions. UNDP has a holistic understanding of and approach to Justice and Security Sector Reform and stresses the interdependence of these sectors and their oversight mechanisms. As a trusted partner to governments and other national actors, UNDP is often well placed to provide support even in sensitive sectors. In general, following a crisis, UNDP sees the restoration of justice and security as a core democratic governance responsibility. UNDP aims to transform justice and security institutions into more effective, legitimate and transparent structures that support the functions of an equitable and rights-respecting state and are accountable to its citizens, and promote the rule of law. As defined by the UN Secretary General in 2004, the concept of rule of law “refers to a principle of governance in which all persons, institutions and entities, public and private, including the State itself, are accountable to laws that are publicly promulgated, equally enforced and independently adjudicated, and which are consistent with international human rights norms and standards.” Security Sector Reform (SSR) works with institutions and actors with the mandate to ensure the safety of the state and its people. These include the police, judges, prosecutors, ombudsmen, elected and appointed civil authorities responsible for democratic oversight of these institutions, and civil society organizations. UNDP provides technical assistance in political dialogue on Rule of Law, Justice & Security topics; in capacity building for accountable, transparent and human rights-based institutions; in police reform; and in human rights and rule of law training. The role of UNDP in supporting security actors is informed by its mandates on democratic governance and crisis prevention and recovery, in particular its mandate to support the strengthening of the rule of law in conflict and post-conflict situations. Against this background, UNDP assists governments to strengthen democratic governance of security institutions by, inter alia, supporting the development of legal security frameworks, improving civilian management and strategic leadership, or developing parliamentary oversight, as a means of strengthening the Rule of Law. For UNDP, democratic governance of security institutions is characterized by: • Civilian management of security policy and implementation. • Legislative and judicial oversight of security institutions. • Compliance and adherence by security institutions to domestic and international law, consistent with human rights standards. • Transparency of policy-making and practice among and within security institutions, including financial, administrative and programme management arrangements. • Space for an active participation of the media and civil society in security affairs. • Security institutions that protect and promote women’s human rights. • Fair and equitable representation in security institutions. • Security services based on, and responsive to, people’s needs. Strengthening the democratic governance of security institutions improves not only security but also the conditions in which it is delivered, and consequently, it helps to bring about an environment in which “real improvements in people’s lives and in the choices and opportunities open to them are possible.” By supporting the democratic governance of security institutions, UNDP believes that security can be enhanced and the enabling conditions that allow for human development and the enjoyment of human rights and protection can flourish. This focus is derived from the conviction that there is a causal connection between “freedom from fear” and “freedom from want.” In UNDP’s partner countries, security institutions that are effective, transparent and accountable will be better equipped to govern and protect the poor and vulnerable in times of economic, political and social instability. UNDP’s engagements respond both to the needs of the people affected by insecurity, as well as their governments’ need to ensure effective security institutions. Uniformed and civilian security institutions function most effectively if based on the principles and practice of democratic governance and oversight.
  • Capacity and development training
  • Direct project implementation
  • Financial support
  • Policy advice
  • Project support services
  • Research and policy development
  • Technical assistance
Description of activities
All of UNDP's work regarding technical assistance and policy advice (see entries in fields above) has a capacity development component, which is a driving factor for UNDP, along with national ownership, gender equality, human rights based approaches, and conflict sensitivity.
UNDP designs, operates and supports programmes through both direct and national execution modalities.
In 2008 and the first half of 2009, UNDP’s Global Programme on Rule of Law has allocated US$29 million for security and justice, and programmed for more than US$ 100 million to support UNDP country programmes on justice and security in conflict and post-conflict settings. UNDP Country Offices can apply for funding from UNDP HQ. SSR related funding sources managed by UNDP HQ are: 1) UNDP regular resources (TRAC 1.1.3) for CPR (managed by BCPR); 2) UNDP Thematic Trust Fund for Crisis Prevention and Recovery (CPRTTF) (managed by BCPR) / UNDP Democratic Governance Trust Fund (managed by BDP). The Global Programme on Rule of Law has its own funding (managed through the CPRTTF) which contributes to launching programmes in priority countries. Countries who have received funding from BCPR managed funds include, inter alia, DRC, Liberia, Guinea-Bissau, Sudan, Haiti, Colombia, Kosovo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Sri Lanka, Sierra Leone, Central African Republic , Timor Leste and Afghanistan.
UNDP offers policy advice to national partners through it's in-house experts at HQ, regional, and Country Office levels, as well as through associated expert networks / consultants. At HQ-level, BCPR has a Rule of Law, Justice & Security (ROLJS) sub-team (part of its Conflict Prevention and Recovery Team) which consists of 7 full-time professional staff positions (in New York and Geneva). UNDP’s Global Programme on Rule of Law in Conflict and Post-Conflict Situations forms the blue-print for UNDP’s approach in conflict and post-conflict countries. A forthcoming Guidance Note on rule of law programming, as well as a concept note on supporting democratic governance of security institutions, will provide further policy clarification and guidance.
This is offered by UNDP country offices, sometimes through other UN agencies, such as UNOPS, and in-country implementing partners / NGOs.
UNDP’s Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery (BCPR) supports research principally through M&E, lessons learning, development of good practices, tools and guidelines. UNDP/BCPR was a key partner in the development of the OECD-DAC CPDC Implementation Framework for Security Sector Reform, which embraces a broad definition of the security sector, i.e. inlcuding linkages with the justice sector. UNDP is strongly convinced that these sectors need to be understood and developed in an holistic and mutually reinforcing manner – with the two pillars of security and justice given equal weight under the broader framework of the rule of law. In 2008, UNDP/BCPR was jointly responsible (with DPKO) for drafting the 2008 Secretary General’s report on the role of the United Nations in supporting SSR. Recently, on 1 June 2009, BCPR launched an e-discussion on rule of law, justice & security, together with DPKO and the Peace-Building Support Office (PBSO). The e-discussion aims to draw on the wealth of expertise on rule of law and SSR from across the UN system, contributing to a more consolidated and streamlined approach by the different actors. A detailed concept note on supporting democratic governance of security institutions is currently being finalised, and a comprehensive Guidance Note on rule of law programming (including SSR) for UNDP in conflict and post-conflict situations is also under development, with publication anticipated for later in 2009. At the inter-agency level, UNDP/BCPR is an active participant in the SSR Task Force with the UN DPKO, and works closely with a number of UN and non-UN actors on SSR, including host governments and INGOs. UNDP’s support for democratic governance of security institutions is intimately connected to its focus on crisis prevention and recovery, long-term democratic governance, and poverty reduction (as captured in the UNDP Strategic Plan 2008-2011).UNDP/BCPR‘s integrated vision of rule of law based on strengthening governance is encapsulated in the UNDP Global Programme Strengthening the Rule of Law in Conflict and Post-Conflict Situations, 2008-2011. The Global Programme provides a framework for UNDP’s engagement on justice and security in more than 20 priority conflict and post-conflict countries from all regions and has a focus on “supporting capacity development of justice and security institutions,” in line with UNDP’s mandate and strategic outcomes.
As a development agency, UNDP focuses on capacity development of national partners. With offices in over 130 countries, UNDP provides programmatic assistance on request of partner/host Governments, tailoring services to national and local needs. UNDP/BCPR’s Rule of Law, Justice & Security Unit, under the Global Programme on Rule of Law, works with UNDP Country Offices to develop comprehensive rule of law programmes. Services with regard to SSR include assessments and the provision of respective tools; training and awareness-raising; access to expert networks; the sharing and provision of best practices through UNDP's global and regional knowledge networks (e.g. CPR-Net, Democratic Governance-Net, etc.). Occasionally, in crisis and post-crisis contexts, UNDP also provides assistance for infrastructure development, e.g. the Police Academy in Liberia.

Gender

Active engagement in developing and making operational policy, practical guidance on gender mainstreaming, capacity building across all sectors of the Bureau and in Country Offices, development of tools, knowledge and information production & sharing.
  • Advocacy
  • Capacity and development training
  • Direct project implementation
  • Financial support
  • Policy advice
  • Project support services
  • Research and policy development
  • Technical assistance
Description of activities
Close affiliation with UNDP's Bureau for Development Policy; as lead of IA Cluster on Early Recovery, close affiliation with UNFPA as leads on gender mainstreaming; active participation in other inter-agency work on gender (eg, the DDR working group) and close working relation with UNIFEM / Global. Promotion of participation of women's NGOs and networks in all CPR work undertaken in-country / Global.
In-house capacity development (particularly on the use of the Eight point agenda) is ongoing; field training on 8PA and UN Action / Global, with specific work in Sudan ,Uganda ,DRC, PNG, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka to date. NEX projects with governments, particularly institutions promoting women's equality; stated goal (in 8PA) to "transform government to deliver for women" / Global.
Technical and operational assistance offered in response to requests generated by Country Offices / Global.
Allocations Committee ensures a minimum 15% gender budget in all relevant projects / Global.
Development of UN Action (Stop Rape in War!) and advice to UN Gender Capacity Surge project / Global, development of general assembly report on 1820 and 1325 resolution.
All BCPR projects receive support from the senior Gender Advisor to ensure gender mainstreaming and women empowerment component is fully reflected / Global.
Development of UNDP's Eight Point Agenda for Women's Empowerment and Gender Equality in Crisis Prevention and Recovery; various research products particularly on small arms and light weapons, DDR, post-disaster needs, disaster risk reduction/ Global. UNDP/BCPR has funded a project to develop intellectual leadership in the area of Gender, Crisis Prevention and Recovery (G-CPR) through the Social Science Research Council (SSRC).
Assistance to UNDP Country Offices; assistance to UN inter-agency working groups; assistance to governments and NGOs; operationalisation of SCR1325 / Global.
Close affiliation with UNDP's Bureau for Development Policy; as lead of IA Cluster on Early Recovery, close affiliation with UNFPA as leads on gender mainstreaming; active participation in other inter-agency work on gender (eg, the DDR working group) and close working relation with UNIFEM / Global. Promotion of participation of women's NGOs and networks in all CPR work undertaken in-country / Global.
  • Africa
    • Central Africa
      • Angola
      • Cameroon
      • Democratic Republic of the Congo
      • Chad
      • Equatorial Guinea
      • Central African Republic
      • Gabon
      • Sao Tome and Principe
    • Eastern Africa
      • Madagascar
      • Mauritius
      • Uganda
      • Mozambique
      • Kenya
      • Somalia
      • Sudan
      • Burundi
      • Rwanda
      • United Republic of Tanzania
      • Ethiopia
      • Eritrea
      • Zambia
      • Malawi
      • Djibouti
      • Comoros
      • Seychelles
      • Zimbabwe
    • Northern Africa
      • Egypt
      • Morocco
      • Algeria
      • Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
      • Tunisia
    • Southern Africa
      • South Africa
      • Swaziland
      • Lesotho
      • Botswana
      • Namibia
    • Western Africa
      • Benin
      • Gambia
      • Ghana
      • Senegal
      • Togo
      • Nigeria
      • Liberia
      • Mauritania
      • Niger
      • Sierra Leone
      • Guinea
      • Burkina Faso
      • Cape Verde
      • Cote d’Ivoire
      • Guinea-Bissau
      • Mali
  • Americas
    • Caribbean
      • Haiti
      • Dominican Republic
      • Jamaica
      • Barbados
      • Cuba
      • Trinidad and Tobago
    • Central America
      • Costa Rica
      • Honduras
      • Panama
      • El-Salvador
      • Guatemala
      • Nicaragua
    • North America
      • Mexico
    • South America
      • Argentina
      • Brazil
      • Chile
      • Paraguay
      • Uruguay
      • Bolivia
      • Colombia
      • Ecuador
      • Peru
      • Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)
      • Guyana
  • Asia
    • Central Asia
      • Kazakhstan
      • Kyrgyzstan
      • Tajikistan
      • Uzbekistan
      • Turkmenistan
    • East Asia
      • Mongolia
      • Republic of Korea
      • China
    • South Asia
      • Maldives
      • Nepal
      • Afghanistan
      • India
      • Pakistan
      • Sri Lanka
      • Bangladesh
      • Iran (Islamic Republic of)
      • Bhutan
    • South East Asia
      • Cambodia
      • Indonesia
      • Philippines
      • Thailand
      • Myanmar
      • Lao People’s Democratic Republic
      • Timor-Leste
      • Viet Nam
      • Malaysia
    • Western Asia
      • Armenia
      • Bahrain
      • Georgia
      • Jordan
      • Lebanon
      • Turkey
      • Yemen
      • Azerbaijan
      • Iraq
      • Israel
      • Palestine
      • Cyprus
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Syrian Arab Republic
      • United Arab Emirates
      • Kuwait
  • Europe
    • Eastern Europe
      • Republic of Moldova
      • Romania
      • Slovakia
      • Kosovo
      • Russian Federation
      • Ukraine
      • Belarus
      • Bulgaria
    • Northern Europe
      • Lithuania
      • Sweden
      • Denmark
      • Norway
    • Western Europe
      • Switzerland
      • Belgium
    • Southern Europe
      • Montenegro
      • Albania
      • Bosnia and Herzegovina
      • Croatia
      • Serbia
      • (The former Yugoslav) Republic of Macedonia
  • Oceania

Guinea Bissau

Sectors of activity: 
Security Sector Governance
Law Enforcement Institutions
DDR
Mine Action
Judicial and Legal Reform
Community Conflict Resolution
Public Administration and Government Strengthening
Elections
Civil Society
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Financial support
Description: 

During the period 2003 – today, the bulk of the support provided by BCPR focused on the following 3 areas of work: Conflict prevention, mine action and more recently on Security Sector Reform. Due to the present security situation in Guinea Bissau the DDR efforts are in a holding pattern. BCPR continues to monitor the political situation. As an interim measure UNDP/BCPR is supporting the CO to engage in a ‘lessons learned’ study of prior reintegration efforts to increase its planning capacities in anticipation of another DDR in the country.
Rule of Law, Justice & Security: As mentioned above, UNDP GB, with the support of BCPR (technical and financial) developed a SSR project in 2008 (8 million dollars for 3 years) that started activities in November 2008. The project focuses on the following areas:
Strengthening the administration of justice. The project will support the Ministry of Justice and provide technical and financial assistance to the court system and the prosecution office. The project will also support national authorities to provide justice services in four selected jurisdictions in the countryside, with infrastructure, equipment for courts, prosecution and legal aid.
Access to justice mechanisms. The project will help the authorities to provide better legal aid services to the poor and disadvantaged. Prevention of SGBV and assistance to SGBV survivors will also be of critical attention. The project will also provide support to law schools and assist to the creation of a law clinic. The project will supply grants to NGOs that provide legal aid services.
Support the law enforcement system. The project will support the Ministry of Internal Affairs to implement the national strategy on regard to the reform of police forces. Similarly, the project will assist the Ministry in improving security services to the population, in particular women, though the implementation of community policy strategies. The project will support training strategies and other support activities.
Strengthen governance of the security sector. In line with its mandate, UNDP will support civilian authorities, in particular the Coordination committee to implement in a coherent way and monitor, the national security strategy that, as said, includes all the rule of law institutions. The project will enhance capacities of line ministries in charge of management and oversight of security institutions as well as support the Parliament with external oversight capacities.
Also, BCPR provided technical support for the design of the Joint programme together with UNOGBIS, UNFPA, UNODC and UNIFEM to strengthen the national justice and security sector reform process.
Mine Action: BCPR has been a long standing partner of the mine action programme in GB, providing extensive funding and technical assistance. Since 2007, the support provided consist mostly in technical advice for a project which suffers from a lack of capacity both in the government and in the CO as evidenced by the fact that for almost two years, the project was left without a Chief Technical Advisor. Support is being provided from Johannesburg (ASRO2) and New-York.
Conflict Prevention: In 2006, a joint UNDP mission of UNDP/BCPR, the UN Department of Political Affairs (DPA) and the UN Inter-departmental Framework for Coordination on Conflict Prevention (the Framework Team) was deployed to Guinea-Bissau. The mission worked closely with UNOGBIS and UNDP/Bissau staff, and consulted with a wide range of national and international stakeholders. As a result of the mission, the programme “Building National Capacities for Dialogue and Collaborative Decision-making in Guinea-Bissau” was formulated. The programme focused on capacity-building for dialogue and collaborative decision-making, in four main areas: (i) enhancing conflict management skills and capacities of the legislative and judicial branches of government; (ii) strengthening the influence and capacity of civil society to engage in participatory dialogue processes with political actors in a collaborative manner; (iii) capacitating the armed forces and political parties to organize stakeholder consultation processes; (iv) preliminary planning for long-term reconstruction of government machinery. The programme was funded by BCPR for a total of USD 450,000.
A number of factors delayed the start of the implementation of the programme, including change of senior management in the UNDP Country Office and recruitment difficulties. A Peace and Development Advisor (PDA) was recruited in February 2008. Two National United Nations Volunteers (UNVs) were also recruited in August 2008. Since her appointment, the PDA has supported UNDP and the UN system in the implementation of a number of initiatives, including in particular:
In the area of Security Sector Reform, the PDA supported the design and organization of a UN workshop for the state institutions involved in public security to address issues of inter-jurisdictional ambiguity
In the area of youth empowerment, the PDA led the design and launching of a pilot Youth Initiative to provide training, accompaniment and funds to youth groups in promoting a culture of peace in Guinea Bissau.
In 2008 a number of developments (primarily the adoption of a roadmap for SSR and the inclusion of Guinea-Bissau in the agenda of the Peacebuilding Commission) have made it necessary to reformulate the programme to better respond to the reality of Guinea-Bissau. The main revisions can be summarized as follows:
The programme is intended as complementary to the newly-established programme “Support to the Rule of Law in Guinea-Bissau through justice and security sector reform”, with a defined focus on strengthening civil society involvement and popular participation in key JSSR processes.
Compared to the original document, the programme has a stronger focus on youth empowerment and participation, building on the lessons of the pilot Youth Advocacy Initiative, and complementing the efforts for youth employment carried out in the context of the Strategic Framework for Peacebuilding in Guinea-Bissau.
The programme has a stronger focus on localized forms of violence, in particular related to access to land and other resources.
The envisaged duration of the programme is four years.

Sierra Leone

Sectors of activity: 
Security Sector Governance
Law Enforcement Institutions
Judicial and Legal Reform
Corrections
Human Rights
Community Conflict Resolution
Civil Society
Gender
Physical Infrastructure and Reconstruction
Employment Generation
Economic Foundations for Growth and Development
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation
Advocacy
Description: 

Livelihoods, armed violence prevention and reduction

Gender mainstreaming

Access to Justice Project (with particular emphasis on Gender Based Violence)

Statebuilding

Livlihoods

DDR
Capacity for post crisis programming: Since 2002, BCPR have been actively engaged in all aspects of the “4R” process by helping the CO to strengthen its overall approach to 4Rs, including through the provision of funds, a reintegration advisor, and support in developing an integrated 4Rs programme with UNHCR and other agencies for donor funding. A recovery strategy has been developed with adequate linkages between humanitarian and development activities. In addition to support to a national small arms reduction initiative, BCPR has also supported the launch of a regional cross-border programme targeting the Mano River Union.
Prevention and reduction of the proliferation of small arms: This has been mainly assisted through an “Arms for Development” programme that sensitizes communities to security issues and empowers them to contribute to arms collec¬tion programmes. In return, communities are being assisted with quick and specific development programmes, such as community centres and school reha¬bilitation. Some 6,000 weapons have been collected in this fashion and some US$2 million is programmed for community rehabilitation with overall US$3 million support from Japan, Germany and Sweden. This programme also sup¬ports the ECOWAS small arms project.
Transition and decentralisation support. Norway, Sweden, Japan and the United Kingdom (DFID) are also assisting with just under US2 million transition and decentralisation support programmes in the form of village and town markets, rehabilitation of police stations, prisons, lorry parks, building of integrated bor¬der posts, and improvement of dump sites and solid waste management practices.
Community rehabilitation: Apart from the community centres, livelihood sup¬port and school rehabilitation under the Arms for Development Programme, District Councils are assisted with capacity strengthening and a wide range of projects and programmes aimed at the restoration of normalcy and the continu¬ing improvement of the delivery of basic services. These programmes comprise the provision of water and sanitation facilities in schools, the provision of agri¬cultural machinery, support to cassava production and livestock support.
Strengthened capacity for disaster response and management: UNDP supports the Disaster Risk Management programmes coordinated by the Office of the National Security (ONS). UNDP assists the consolidation of peace also by fo¬cusing on early warnings systems to prevent disasters and conflicts. A BCPR mission was undertaken to commence dialogue with the Government. This was followed by a national Needs Assessment study to determine the various risks (manmade and natural) profiles that the country has for disasters.
Peace Building Fund: UNDP will play a key role in the implementation of pro¬grammes funded through the Peace Building Fund (PBF), particularly those aimed at reducing youth employment (approved in April 2007), improving secu¬rity (support to the Police and to the Armed Forces) and democratic governance, which programmes in turn are approved for support from the PBF. BCPR rapid Deployment facility programme have provided 2 UNVs (Finance and procurement) to speed up procurement and management of 28 million PBF funds. The support was very important, especially during the October 2007 elections.

Central African Republic

Sectors of activity: 
Security Sector Governance
Law Enforcement Institutions
DDR
Civilian Small Arms Control
Judicial and Legal Reform
Corrections
Community Conflict Resolution
Public Administration and Government Strengthening
Local Governance
Coordination of International Assistance
Political Parties
Civil Society
Gender
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation
Advocacy
Description: 

Rule of Law: As part of a broader conflict prevention strategy for the country, UNDP designed an US$ 8 million project which aims at: 1) strengthening justice institutions to deliver justice services to the people (Ministry of Justice, prosecution service, courts) with a strong focus on rural areas; 2) improving access to justice, especially for women (including GBV), supporting legal aid, a legal clinic, traditional justice systems and the bar association; 3) supporting law enforcement institutions to deliver security services and 4) supporting governance aspects of security institutions (Ministries, legal framework for security institutions, parliamentary oversight). The project started activities in the second half of 2008

DDR: In January 2009 UNDP was appointed the Organ Executif to managing the DDR effort in CAR. This was endorsed at the policy level in Libreville by the Comite de Suivi and at the managerial/operational level in Bangui by the Comite de Pilotage. Subsequently the BCPR DDR Team has assisted the CO in constituting a preparatory DDR team. Since this time a project document, budget and JOP have been developed. BCPR successfully advocated for financial support with the PBF allocating 4 million USD to the DDR effort. Additional advocacy and support efforts include an additional 12 million of CEMAC funding towards the DDR programme

Burundi

Sectors of activity: 
Security Sector Governance
Law Enforcement Institutions
DDR
Civilian Small Arms Control
Transitional Justice
Judicial and Legal Reform
Corrections
Human Rights
Community Conflict Resolution
Gender
Physical Infrastructure and Reconstruction
Employment Generation
Economic Foundations for Growth and Development
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Advocacy
Monitoring and Evaluation
Description: 

UNDP operates in Burundi as part of the Bureau Intégrée des Nations Unies au Burundi (BINUB) which was established on 1 January 2007 as a peace-building mission pursuant to Security Council resolution 1719 (2006) following the withdrawal of ONUB. UNDP is charged with the execution of the majority of projects implemented through BINUB’s three joint sections: Peace and Governance; Human Rights and Justice; and Security Sector Reform and Small Arms.
In late 2006, Burundi and Sierra Leone were the first countries to receive allocations from the Peace Building Fund (PBF). Both countries are also before the Peace Building Commission (PBC). The majority of projects funded by the PBF in Burundi are executed by UNDP, which are implemented through BINUB’s joint sections. UNDP PBF projects represent US$27.4 million of the total US$35 million PBF envelope for Burundi.
The UN’s response has been carried out on two levels—the political and the programmatic levels. This organization reflects the desire to provide sustained, integrated and reliable support to the peace consolidation process in Burundi. At the political level, this response is provided through the implementation of the Security Council’s resolution regarding BINUB’s mandate.
The priorities outlined in the May 2006 Agreement and in the UN Common Action Plan have provided a framework for defining the role of UNDP within the context of the UN Integrated Office in Burundi (BINUB). In particular, UNDP has assumed a leading role by providing programmatic technical expertise within BINUB’s three integrated sections of Peace and Governance, Human Rights and Justice, and Security Sector Reform and Small Arms, as well as to the Resident/Humanitarian Coordinator, towards the development and implementation of joint programmes including PBF funded peace-building priority plan projects.
UNDP is charged with the execution of 14 of the 18 projects comprising Burundi’s PBF Peace building Priority Plan, as well as two additional PBF Emergency Window projects to Support the implementation of the Regional Facilitation’s Plan of Action to take further the Burundi peace process and Support to DDR – Phase 1. These 15 UNDP execution projects represent US$26.4 million of the total US$35 million PBF envelope for Burundi.
At the program level, UNDP is involved in community recovery programmes, including support to communities, national structures—central and local—and local civil society organizations involved in responding to the socio-economic recovery needs and effectively participate in the peace consolidation process. UNDP Early recovery approach aims: a) to revive local economies through rehabilitating assets and production capacity, with a particular accent on the promotion of local private enterprise and associations, and targeting youth, women and other high-risk groups; b) to facilitate access to decent and functional basic social services; c) to promote local governance and security by strengthening community capacities and inclusive decision making mechanisms.
UNDP also brings its support to Government efforts in the area of securing communities by making the national security forces more professional and basing them more locally, reducing the proliferation and circulation of small arms and light weapons and disarming the civilian population. UNDP aims, among other things, to consolidate the practice of dialogue and peaceful resolution of differences—especially land conflicts—within communities, in order to strengthen social reconciliation and cohesion.
DDR: In December 2008 the WB administered MDRP for DDR expired. Since this time UNDP, as part of the integrated SA Team has established a platform for assisting in the areas of disarmament and demobilization, which includes upwards of 11,000 former FNL and associated personnel. The BCPR Team participated in a joint TAM, as well as an independent assessment mission in February 2009 with a follow-up mission planned for 2009 3rd quarter. Efforts supporting resource mobilization into a ‘basket fund’ have facilitated jump starting the stalled DDR effort. Additional efforts include integrating UNDP Early Recovery efforts with reintegration of FNL former combatants.

Guinea Bissau

Sectors of activity: 
Security Sector Governance
Law Enforcement Institutions
DDR
Mine Action
Judicial and Legal Reform
Community Conflict Resolution
Public Administration and Government Strengthening
Elections
Civil Society
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Financial support
Description: 

During the period 2003 – today, the bulk of the support provided by BCPR focused on the following 3 areas of work: Conflict prevention, mine action and more recently on Security Sector Reform. Due to the present security situation in Guinea Bissau the DDR efforts are in a holding pattern. BCPR continues to monitor the political situation. As an interim measure UNDP/BCPR is supporting the CO to engage in a ‘lessons learned’ study of prior reintegration efforts to increase its planning capacities in anticipation of another DDR in the country.
Rule of Law, Justice & Security: As mentioned above, UNDP GB, with the support of BCPR (technical and financial) developed a SSR project in 2008 (8 million dollars for 3 years) that started activities in November 2008. The project focuses on the following areas:
Strengthening the administration of justice. The project will support the Ministry of Justice and provide technical and financial assistance to the court system and the prosecution office. The project will also support national authorities to provide justice services in four selected jurisdictions in the countryside, with infrastructure, equipment for courts, prosecution and legal aid.
Access to justice mechanisms. The project will help the authorities to provide better legal aid services to the poor and disadvantaged. Prevention of SGBV and assistance to SGBV survivors will also be of critical attention. The project will also provide support to law schools and assist to the creation of a law clinic. The project will supply grants to NGOs that provide legal aid services.
Support the law enforcement system. The project will support the Ministry of Internal Affairs to implement the national strategy on regard to the reform of police forces. Similarly, the project will assist the Ministry in improving security services to the population, in particular women, though the implementation of community policy strategies. The project will support training strategies and other support activities.
Strengthen governance of the security sector. In line with its mandate, UNDP will support civilian authorities, in particular the Coordination committee to implement in a coherent way and monitor, the national security strategy that, as said, includes all the rule of law institutions. The project will enhance capacities of line ministries in charge of management and oversight of security institutions as well as support the Parliament with external oversight capacities.
Also, BCPR provided technical support for the design of the Joint programme together with UNOGBIS, UNFPA, UNODC and UNIFEM to strengthen the national justice and security sector reform process.
Mine Action: BCPR has been a long standing partner of the mine action programme in GB, providing extensive funding and technical assistance. Since 2007, the support provided consist mostly in technical advice for a project which suffers from a lack of capacity both in the government and in the CO as evidenced by the fact that for almost two years, the project was left without a Chief Technical Advisor. Support is being provided from Johannesburg (ASRO2) and New-York.
Conflict Prevention: In 2006, a joint UNDP mission of UNDP/BCPR, the UN Department of Political Affairs (DPA) and the UN Inter-departmental Framework for Coordination on Conflict Prevention (the Framework Team) was deployed to Guinea-Bissau. The mission worked closely with UNOGBIS and UNDP/Bissau staff, and consulted with a wide range of national and international stakeholders. As a result of the mission, the programme “Building National Capacities for Dialogue and Collaborative Decision-making in Guinea-Bissau” was formulated. The programme focused on capacity-building for dialogue and collaborative decision-making, in four main areas: (i) enhancing conflict management skills and capacities of the legislative and judicial branches of government; (ii) strengthening the influence and capacity of civil society to engage in participatory dialogue processes with political actors in a collaborative manner; (iii) capacitating the armed forces and political parties to organize stakeholder consultation processes; (iv) preliminary planning for long-term reconstruction of government machinery. The programme was funded by BCPR for a total of USD 450,000.
A number of factors delayed the start of the implementation of the programme, including change of senior management in the UNDP Country Office and recruitment difficulties. A Peace and Development Advisor (PDA) was recruited in February 2008. Two National United Nations Volunteers (UNVs) were also recruited in August 2008. Since her appointment, the PDA has supported UNDP and the UN system in the implementation of a number of initiatives, including in particular:
In the area of Security Sector Reform, the PDA supported the design and organization of a UN workshop for the state institutions involved in public security to address issues of inter-jurisdictional ambiguity
In the area of youth empowerment, the PDA led the design and launching of a pilot Youth Initiative to provide training, accompaniment and funds to youth groups in promoting a culture of peace in Guinea Bissau.
In 2008 a number of developments (primarily the adoption of a roadmap for SSR and the inclusion of Guinea-Bissau in the agenda of the Peacebuilding Commission) have made it necessary to reformulate the programme to better respond to the reality of Guinea-Bissau. The main revisions can be summarized as follows:
The programme is intended as complementary to the newly-established programme “Support to the Rule of Law in Guinea-Bissau through justice and security sector reform”, with a defined focus on strengthening civil society involvement and popular participation in key JSSR processes.
Compared to the original document, the programme has a stronger focus on youth empowerment and participation, building on the lessons of the pilot Youth Advocacy Initiative, and complementing the efforts for youth employment carried out in the context of the Strategic Framework for Peacebuilding in Guinea-Bissau.
The programme has a stronger focus on localized forms of violence, in particular related to access to land and other resources.
The envisaged duration of the programme is four years.

Sierra Leone

Sectors of activity: 
Security Sector Governance
Law Enforcement Institutions
Judicial and Legal Reform
Corrections
Human Rights
Community Conflict Resolution
Civil Society
Gender
Physical Infrastructure and Reconstruction
Employment Generation
Economic Foundations for Growth and Development
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation
Advocacy
Description: 

Livelihoods, armed violence prevention and reduction

Gender mainstreaming

Access to Justice Project (with particular emphasis on Gender Based Violence)

Statebuilding

Livlihoods

DDR
Capacity for post crisis programming: Since 2002, BCPR have been actively engaged in all aspects of the “4R” process by helping the CO to strengthen its overall approach to 4Rs, including through the provision of funds, a reintegration advisor, and support in developing an integrated 4Rs programme with UNHCR and other agencies for donor funding. A recovery strategy has been developed with adequate linkages between humanitarian and development activities. In addition to support to a national small arms reduction initiative, BCPR has also supported the launch of a regional cross-border programme targeting the Mano River Union.
Prevention and reduction of the proliferation of small arms: This has been mainly assisted through an “Arms for Development” programme that sensitizes communities to security issues and empowers them to contribute to arms collec¬tion programmes. In return, communities are being assisted with quick and specific development programmes, such as community centres and school reha¬bilitation. Some 6,000 weapons have been collected in this fashion and some US$2 million is programmed for community rehabilitation with overall US$3 million support from Japan, Germany and Sweden. This programme also sup¬ports the ECOWAS small arms project.
Transition and decentralisation support. Norway, Sweden, Japan and the United Kingdom (DFID) are also assisting with just under US2 million transition and decentralisation support programmes in the form of village and town markets, rehabilitation of police stations, prisons, lorry parks, building of integrated bor¬der posts, and improvement of dump sites and solid waste management practices.
Community rehabilitation: Apart from the community centres, livelihood sup¬port and school rehabilitation under the Arms for Development Programme, District Councils are assisted with capacity strengthening and a wide range of projects and programmes aimed at the restoration of normalcy and the continu¬ing improvement of the delivery of basic services. These programmes comprise the provision of water and sanitation facilities in schools, the provision of agri¬cultural machinery, support to cassava production and livestock support.
Strengthened capacity for disaster response and management: UNDP supports the Disaster Risk Management programmes coordinated by the Office of the National Security (ONS). UNDP assists the consolidation of peace also by fo¬cusing on early warnings systems to prevent disasters and conflicts. A BCPR mission was undertaken to commence dialogue with the Government. This was followed by a national Needs Assessment study to determine the various risks (manmade and natural) profiles that the country has for disasters.
Peace Building Fund: UNDP will play a key role in the implementation of pro¬grammes funded through the Peace Building Fund (PBF), particularly those aimed at reducing youth employment (approved in April 2007), improving secu¬rity (support to the Police and to the Armed Forces) and democratic governance, which programmes in turn are approved for support from the PBF. BCPR rapid Deployment facility programme have provided 2 UNVs (Finance and procurement) to speed up procurement and management of 28 million PBF funds. The support was very important, especially during the October 2007 elections.

Central African Republic

Sectors of activity: 
Security Sector Governance
Law Enforcement Institutions
DDR
Civilian Small Arms Control
Judicial and Legal Reform
Corrections
Community Conflict Resolution
Public Administration and Government Strengthening
Local Governance
Coordination of International Assistance
Political Parties
Civil Society
Gender
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation
Advocacy
Description: 

Rule of Law: As part of a broader conflict prevention strategy for the country, UNDP designed an US$ 8 million project which aims at: 1) strengthening justice institutions to deliver justice services to the people (Ministry of Justice, prosecution service, courts) with a strong focus on rural areas; 2) improving access to justice, especially for women (including GBV), supporting legal aid, a legal clinic, traditional justice systems and the bar association; 3) supporting law enforcement institutions to deliver security services and 4) supporting governance aspects of security institutions (Ministries, legal framework for security institutions, parliamentary oversight). The project started activities in the second half of 2008

DDR: In January 2009 UNDP was appointed the Organ Executif to managing the DDR effort in CAR. This was endorsed at the policy level in Libreville by the Comite de Suivi and at the managerial/operational level in Bangui by the Comite de Pilotage. Subsequently the BCPR DDR Team has assisted the CO in constituting a preparatory DDR team. Since this time a project document, budget and JOP have been developed. BCPR successfully advocated for financial support with the PBF allocating 4 million USD to the DDR effort. Additional advocacy and support efforts include an additional 12 million of CEMAC funding towards the DDR programme

Burundi

Sectors of activity: 
Security Sector Governance
Law Enforcement Institutions
DDR
Civilian Small Arms Control
Transitional Justice
Judicial and Legal Reform
Corrections
Human Rights
Community Conflict Resolution
Gender
Physical Infrastructure and Reconstruction
Employment Generation
Economic Foundations for Growth and Development
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Advocacy
Monitoring and Evaluation
Description: 

UNDP operates in Burundi as part of the Bureau Intégrée des Nations Unies au Burundi (BINUB) which was established on 1 January 2007 as a peace-building mission pursuant to Security Council resolution 1719 (2006) following the withdrawal of ONUB. UNDP is charged with the execution of the majority of projects implemented through BINUB’s three joint sections: Peace and Governance; Human Rights and Justice; and Security Sector Reform and Small Arms.
In late 2006, Burundi and Sierra Leone were the first countries to receive allocations from the Peace Building Fund (PBF). Both countries are also before the Peace Building Commission (PBC). The majority of projects funded by the PBF in Burundi are executed by UNDP, which are implemented through BINUB’s joint sections. UNDP PBF projects represent US$27.4 million of the total US$35 million PBF envelope for Burundi.
The UN’s response has been carried out on two levels—the political and the programmatic levels. This organization reflects the desire to provide sustained, integrated and reliable support to the peace consolidation process in Burundi. At the political level, this response is provided through the implementation of the Security Council’s resolution regarding BINUB’s mandate.
The priorities outlined in the May 2006 Agreement and in the UN Common Action Plan have provided a framework for defining the role of UNDP within the context of the UN Integrated Office in Burundi (BINUB). In particular, UNDP has assumed a leading role by providing programmatic technical expertise within BINUB’s three integrated sections of Peace and Governance, Human Rights and Justice, and Security Sector Reform and Small Arms, as well as to the Resident/Humanitarian Coordinator, towards the development and implementation of joint programmes including PBF funded peace-building priority plan projects.
UNDP is charged with the execution of 14 of the 18 projects comprising Burundi’s PBF Peace building Priority Plan, as well as two additional PBF Emergency Window projects to Support the implementation of the Regional Facilitation’s Plan of Action to take further the Burundi peace process and Support to DDR – Phase 1. These 15 UNDP execution projects represent US$26.4 million of the total US$35 million PBF envelope for Burundi.
At the program level, UNDP is involved in community recovery programmes, including support to communities, national structures—central and local—and local civil society organizations involved in responding to the socio-economic recovery needs and effectively participate in the peace consolidation process. UNDP Early recovery approach aims: a) to revive local economies through rehabilitating assets and production capacity, with a particular accent on the promotion of local private enterprise and associations, and targeting youth, women and other high-risk groups; b) to facilitate access to decent and functional basic social services; c) to promote local governance and security by strengthening community capacities and inclusive decision making mechanisms.
UNDP also brings its support to Government efforts in the area of securing communities by making the national security forces more professional and basing them more locally, reducing the proliferation and circulation of small arms and light weapons and disarming the civilian population. UNDP aims, among other things, to consolidate the practice of dialogue and peaceful resolution of differences—especially land conflicts—within communities, in order to strengthen social reconciliation and cohesion.
DDR: In December 2008 the WB administered MDRP for DDR expired. Since this time UNDP, as part of the integrated SA Team has established a platform for assisting in the areas of disarmament and demobilization, which includes upwards of 11,000 former FNL and associated personnel. The BCPR Team participated in a joint TAM, as well as an independent assessment mission in February 2009 with a follow-up mission planned for 2009 3rd quarter. Efforts supporting resource mobilization into a ‘basket fund’ have facilitated jump starting the stalled DDR effort. Additional efforts include integrating UNDP Early Recovery efforts with reintegration of FNL former combatants.

United Nations Development Programme, Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery (UNDP/BCPR)
Chemin des Anemones 11-13, Chatelaine
Geneva CH-1219
United Nations
New York and Geneva
More than 10 years
(New York & Geneva): Circa 135
Chemin des Anemones 11-13, Chatelaine
Geneva CH-1219
Other

1) Provide technical expertise: By serving as a repository for tools, methods, and experience, UNDP/BCPR provides both technical knowledge and financial resources to support prevention and recovery efforts. 2) Protect women and give them a voice: Security threats to women escalate in times of crisis. UNDP/BCPR seeks to empower women and girls and give them a voice in the recovery effort through its Eight Point Agenda for Women's Empowerment and Gender Equality in Crisis Prevention and Recovery. 3) Recognize the importance of partners: UNDP/BCPR fosters partnerships to design and implement crisis and recovery programmes. 4) Develop policy and contribute to the capacity of societies in crisis to prevent and resolve conflict. 5) Provide leadership on crisis issues, serving as a centre for crisis policy and best practice for partner agencies and governments. 6) Advocate for crisis sensitivity. UNDP/BCPR works to ensure that long-term development policies and programmes incorporate opportunities for disaster reduction and conflict prevention

Mr. Peter Batchelor
Chief, Conflict Team, UNDP/BCPR

Partnership

DCAF

Description: 

Having been engaged with DCAF in research on Gender and Security Sector Reform, UNDP is now providing financial assistance to translate and disseminate the Gender and SSR toolkit.

Partner organisations: 
Academic

Early Recovery Cluster

Description: 

Gender lead is taken by UNFPA with whom we closely collaborate.

Partner organisations: 
UN
I/NGO
Co-ordinator of cluster

IASC Early Recovery Cluster

Type: 
Formal
Location: 
International Partnership
Main purpose: 
Policy
Description: 

NGO, United Nations. In 2005 the IASC undertook a review of the global humanitarian system, which identified weaknesses in the system-wide humanitarian response to crises. As part of the humanitarian reform process that followed, the IASC adopted the ‘cluster approach’, which established eleven inter-agency working groups (clusters) to strengthen leadership, partnership, and build system-wide accountability and predictability for humanitarian action.
UNDP was appointed the lead agency for the Early Recovery Cluster, which works to establish the foundations for longer-term recovery in the immediate aftermath of a crisis in both natural disaster and conflict situations. These foundations include early efforts to secure stability, provision of basic services, ‘building back better’ by addressing root causes of vulnerability or conflict, revival of livelihoods, restoring local capacities of communities and national institutions to govern and manage recovery planning and development processes. 30 humanitarian and development agencies, including 9 NGOs are formal members of the Cluster Working Group on Early Recovery (CWGER) at the global level.

Partner organisations: 
United Nations
NGOs

Rule of Law Coordination and Resource Group (RoLCRG)

Type: 
Formal
Location: 
International Partnership
Main purpose: 
Policy
Description: 

The United Nations is engaged in an on-going process to strengthen its attention to the rule of law at the national and international levels. Ultimately under the authority and direction of the Secretary-General, the responsibility for the overall coordination of the Organization’s rule of law work rests with the Rule of Law Coordination and Resource Group, chaired by the Deputy Secretary-General, and supported by the Rule of Law Unit. Its role is to ensure coherence and minimize fragmentation across all thematic areas, including justice, security, prison and penal reform, legal reform, constitution-making and transitional justice. The Group conducted a mapping of planned 2008 rule of law activities, which reflected the challenges to coordination and coherence of United Nations rule of law assistance. Between April and December 2008 RoLCRG has also drafted a Joint Strategic Plan for its activities in 2009-2011. The Plan lays out an agenda for key United Nations rule of law efforts to be undertaken by the Group. It outlines the strategic principal outcomes, outputs and joint activities, to which the members of Group will contribute. This inter-agency body is of key importance for UNDP RoLJS initiatives that carry system-wide significance. RoLCRG facilitates UNDP’s contribution to policy making regarding issues of importance for broader system framework, knowledge-sharing and coordination of in-country activities in the field. UNDP has supported the initiative to establish a Strategic Plan for RoLCRG and has consistently and substantively contributed to the outcome document.

Partner organisations: 
United Nations

SEESAC

Description: 

Gender and small arms research and advocacy

Partner organisations: 
United Nations

Network

Integrated DDR training group (IDDRTG)

Description: 

Training institutes / A network of training institutes (mainly linked to member states) that runs training programmes on DDR.

Inter-agency working group on DDR

Type: 
United Nations / IOs
Main purpose: 
Policy
Description: 

United Nations / 14 UN agencies, funds and programmes
The UN DDR Resource Centre is developed and managed by the UN Inter-Agency Working Group on DDR. The Working Group also performs the following key functions:
• Provide strategic advice to assist the Organization in improving its work on DDR. This includes among others, advice on the required changes, or adjustments, to the structure and processes in the Organization relating to DDR planning, implementation and monitoring;
• Maintain and review the developed set of United Nations guidance on DDR, including recommending how such a body of guidance can systematically and periodically reviewed and updated;
• Advise the Organization on training needs, policies and strategies in the areas of DDR, including coordinating the roll out of this set of guidance to all United Nations partners engaged in DDR;
• Develop and manage the United Nations DDR Resource Centre;
• Facilitate planning of DDR operations among relevant UN agencies;
• Undertake other DDR activities as appropriate.

SSR Task Force

Type: 
Other
Other: 
United Nations DPKO

UN Action to Stop Rape in War

Type: 
Informal
Type: 
United Nations / IOs
Description: 

UN Action against Sexual Violence in Conflict (UN Action) unites the work of 12 UN entities with the aim of preventing all forms of gender based violence (GBV), including sexual violence in conflict. It is a ‘concerted effort by the UN to improve coordination and accountability, amplify programming and advocacy, and support national efforts to prevent sexual violence and respond effectively to the needs of survivors.’ Raising public awareness of GBV related issues through advocacy is a key role of UN Action, in particular through the ‘Stop Rape Now’ campaign. The focus of UN action often specifically targets the peacekeeping context, responding to requests from RCs or SRSGs to provide advice on the development of a comprehensive strategy to combat SGBV in conflict. Notably, UN action has supported initiatives in DRC and South Sudan through funding and training. UNDP/BCPR assists UN action with financial contribution and supports UN Action’s role as a catalyst to nudge other actors to do more.

Women's peacebuilding networks

Description: 

We work closely with women's peacebuilding networks, both global and national, to promote the 8 Point Agenda.