World Health Organization (WHO)

WHO fulfils its objectives through its core functions: 1) Providing leadership on matters critical to health and engaging in partnerships where joint action is needed; 2) Shaping the research agenda and stimulating the generation, translation and dissemination of valuable knowledge; 3) Setting norms and standards and promoting and monitoring their implementation; 4) Articulating ethical and evidence-based policy options; 5) Providing technical support, catalysing change, and building sustainable institutional capacity; 6) Monitoring the health situation and assessing health trends.

WHO is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system. It is responsible for providing leadership on global health matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating evidence-based policy options, providing technical support to countries and monitoring and assessing health trends. In the 21st century, health is a shared responsibility, involving equitable access to essential care and collective defence against transnational threats.

Health as a Bridge for Peace (HBP) is a multidimensional policy and planning framework which supports health workers and delivering health programmes in societies prone to and affected by wars and, at the same time, contributes to peacebuilding.
(Peacebuilding is the effort to strengthen the prospect for internal peace and decrease the likelihood of violent conflict. The overreaching goal of peacebuilding is to enhance the indigenous capacity of a society to manage a conflict without violence. The definition covers peacebuilding in pre, mid and post conflict situation.)

  • Civil Society
  • Community Conflict Resolution
  • Coordination of International Assistance
  • DDR
  • Gender
  • Good Offices and Peace Support
  • Human Rights
  • Humanitarian Assistance
  • Humanitarian Protection
  • Local Governance
  • Physical Infrastructure and Reconstruction
  • Public Administration and Government Strengthening
  • Public Health

Public Health

WHO is the lead technical agency in the area of public health. It is also the lead agency of the Global Health Cluster and usually of Health Clusters within countries. Its comparative advantage stems from its wealth in terms of technical expertise, its long history of work in the field of health, its country offices which are functional in more than 190 Member States, its partnerships with various organizations (UN, non-UN Humanitarian agencies, NGOs, donors, financial agencies and the academia) and its work with and through hundreds of collaborating centers in the six regions.
More than 300 million CHF per annum
  • Advocacy
  • Capacity and development training
  • Direct project implementation
  • Financial support
  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Policy advice
  • Project support services
  • Research and policy development
  • Technical assistance
Description of activities
WHO activities aimed at health development give priority to health outcomes in poor, disadvantaged or vulnerable groups (all Member states, but particularly in countries in crises). The world's ability to defend itself collectively against outbreaks has been strengthened in June 2007, when the revised International Health Regulations came into force (all Member states, but particularly in countries in crises). Areas being addressed include human resources for health, health financing, vital statistics, and access to appropriate technology including essential drugs (all Member states, but particularly in countries in crises).
Developing capacity across the organization, among partners and among national stakeholders / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Support to project implementation in countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Fund raising to support public health programmes in countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Incorporate public health issues into monitoring and evaluation tools of the Health Cluster, e.g. HIS (health information system) / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Providing policy advice on strengthening health systems for countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Support implementation of public health projects in Countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Documenting lessons learned from countries in crises and using them for policy development / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Providing technical assistance to countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
WHO activities aimed at health development give priority to health outcomes in poor, disadvantaged or vulnerable groups (all Member states, but particularly in countries in crises). The world's ability to defend itself collectively against outbreaks has been strengthened in June 2007, when the revised International Health Regulations came into force (all Member states, but particularly in countries in crises). Areas being addressed include human resources for health, health financing, vital statistics, and access to appropriate technology including essential drugs (all Member states, but particularly in countries in crises).

Humanitarian Assistance

WHO is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system. It is responsible for providing leadership on global health matters in the context of humanitarian assistance.
Between 100 million to 300 million CHF per annum
  • Advocacy
  • Capacity and development training
  • Direct project implementation
  • Financial support
  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Policy advice
  • Project support services
  • Research and policy development
  • Technical assistance
Description of activities
As Lead Agency for global health matters involved in Inter Agency Standing Committee work; All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Developing capacity across the organization, among partners and among national stakeholders / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Support to project implementation in countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Fund raising to support public health programmes in countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Incorporate humanitarian assistance issues into monitoring and evaluation tools of the Health Cluster, e.g. HIS (health information system), IRA (Initial Rapid Assessment), EWARS (early warning & response system), HeRAMS (Health resources availability and mapping system). All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Providing policy advice on strengthening health systems for countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Support implementation of humanitarian assistance projects in countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Documenting lessons learned from countries in crises and using them for policy development / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
Providing technical assistance to countries in crises / All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.
As Lead Agency for global health matters involved in Inter Agency Standing Committee work; All Member states, but particularly in countries in crises.

Gender

As the technical lead of health and the lead of the Health Cluster WHO’s added value is in supporting the mainstreaming of gender in the health response in emergencies.
Between 1 million to 50 million CHF per annum
  • Advocacy
  • Capacity and development training
  • Direct project implementation
  • Financial support
  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Policy advice
  • Project support services
  • Research and policy development
  • Technical assistance
Description of activities
Mainstreaming gender in capacity development activities (WHO, Health Cluster and IASC), on steering committee of IASC-GenCAP.
Support to project implementation in crises affected countries
Support to resource mobilization in crises affected countries
Support to IASC work on sex and age disaggregated data and gender analysis; Incorporate women health issue into assessment tools of the Health Cluster
Providing policy advise on gender and health – all regions, particularly affected countries in crises
Support project implementation in crises affected countries
IASC-SWG on Gender
Technical assistance to countries including crises affected on issues related to gender and women
  • Africa
    • Central Africa
      • Angola
      • Cameroon
      • Democratic Republic of the Congo
      • Chad
      • Equatorial Guinea
      • Central African Republic
      • Gabon
      • Sao Tome and Principe
    • Eastern Africa
      • Madagascar
      • Mauritius
      • Uganda
      • Mozambique
      • Kenya
      • Somalia
      • Sudan
      • Burundi
      • Rwanda
      • United Republic of Tanzania
      • Ethiopia
      • Eritrea
      • Zambia
      • Malawi
      • Djibouti
      • Comoros
      • Seychelles
      • Zimbabwe
    • Northern Africa
      • Egypt
      • Morocco
      • Western Sahara
      • Algeria
      • Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
      • Tunisia
    • Southern Africa
      • South Africa
      • Swaziland
      • Lesotho
      • Botswana
      • Namibia
    • Western Africa
      • Benin
      • Gambia
      • Ghana
      • Senegal
      • Togo
      • Nigeria
      • Liberia
      • Mauritania
      • Niger
      • Sierra Leone
      • Guinea
      • Burkina Faso
      • Cape Verde
      • Cote d’Ivoire
      • Guinea-Bissau
      • Mali
  • Americas
    • Caribbean
      • Haiti
      • Dominican Republic
      • Jamaica
      • Antigua and Barbuda
      • Bahamas
      • Barbados
      • Cuba
      • Dominica
      • Grenada
      • Saint Kitts and Nevis
      • Saint Lucia
      • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
      • Trinidad and Tobago
    • Central America
      • Costa Rica
      • Honduras
      • Panama
      • El-Salvador
      • Guatemala
      • Nicaragua
      • Belize
    • North America
      • Mexico
      • United States of America
      • Canada
    • South America
      • Argentina
      • Brazil
      • Chile
      • Paraguay
      • Uruguay
      • Bolivia
      • Colombia
      • Ecuador
      • Peru
      • Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)
      • French Guiana
      • Guyana
      • Suriname
  • Asia
    • Central Asia
      • Kazakhstan
      • Kyrgyzstan
      • Tajikistan
      • Uzbekistan
      • Turkmenistan
    • East Asia
      • Mongolia
      • Republic of Korea
      • China
      • Japan
      • Republic of China (Taiwan)
      • Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
    • South Asia
      • Maldives
      • Nepal
      • Afghanistan
      • India
      • Pakistan
      • Sri Lanka
      • Bangladesh
      • Iran (Islamic Republic of)
      • Bhutan
    • South East Asia
      • Cambodia
      • Indonesia
      • Philippines
      • Thailand
      • Myanmar
      • Singapore
      • Lao People’s Democratic Republic
      • Timor-Leste
      • Brunei Darussalam
      • Viet Nam
      • Malaysia
    • Western Asia
      • Armenia
      • Bahrain
      • Georgia
      • Jordan
      • Lebanon
      • Turkey
      • Yemen
      • Azerbaijan
      • Iraq
      • Israel
      • Palestine
      • Cyprus
      • Oman
      • Qatar
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Syrian Arab Republic
      • United Arab Emirates
      • Kuwait
  • Europe
    • Eastern Europe
      • Republic of Moldova
      • Romania
      • Czech Republic
      • Slovakia
      • Kosovo
      • Russian Federation
      • Ukraine
      • Poland
      • Belarus
      • Bulgaria
      • Hungary
    • Northern Europe
      • Estonia
      • Latvia
      • Lithuania
      • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
      • Sweden
      • Denmark
      • Finland
      • Iceland
      • Norway
      • Ireland
    • Western Europe
      • Austria
      • France
      • Liechtenstein
      • Switzerland
      • Belgium
      • Netherlands
      • Germany
      • Luxembourg
      • Monaco
    • Southern Europe
      • Montenegro
      • Spain
      • Albania
      • Italy
      • Bosnia and Herzegovina
      • Croatia
      • Serbia
      • Malta
      • Greece
      • Portugal
      • Slovenia
      • Andorra
      • Holy See
      • San Marino
      • (The former Yugoslav) Republic of Macedonia
  • Oceania

Burundi

Sectors of activity: 
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation
Description: 

WHO has provided technical assistance in areas of:

Improving access to health services was important in terms of societal stabilization
WHO provides financial assistance

Strengthening the health system and make available essential health care packages

Enhancing emergency management of obstetrical maternal and neonatal care

WHO encourages formal commitment from partners to increase their support for sustained peace

polio vaccination campaign usually provides a window for cease-fire

Guinea Bissau

Sectors of activity: 
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation

Central African Republic

Sectors of activity: 
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation
Description: 

Obstetric and neonatal care

HIV/AIDS Prevention

Accessibility to health services for vulnerable populations

Sierra Leone

Sectors of activity: 
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Description: 

Partnership coordination, WHO presence in the area

WHO provides advise on the way forward

Health transition from emergency to recovery /development

For example WHO planned costs for year 2006-2007 was 1,763,000 USD

Health promotion, Disease prevention and control

Reproductive, child and adolescent health

polio vaccination campaign usually provides a window for cease-fire

Burundi

Sectors of activity: 
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation
Description: 

WHO has provided technical assistance in areas of:

Improving access to health services was important in terms of societal stabilization
WHO provides financial assistance

Strengthening the health system and make available essential health care packages

Enhancing emergency management of obstetrical maternal and neonatal care

WHO encourages formal commitment from partners to increase their support for sustained peace

polio vaccination campaign usually provides a window for cease-fire

Guinea Bissau

Sectors of activity: 
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation

Central African Republic

Sectors of activity: 
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Monitoring and Evaluation
Description: 

Obstetric and neonatal care

HIV/AIDS Prevention

Accessibility to health services for vulnerable populations

Sierra Leone

Sectors of activity: 
Humanitarian Assistance
Types of activity: 
Technical assistance
Policy advice
Direct project implementation
Financial support
Capacity and development training
Project support services
Description: 

Partnership coordination, WHO presence in the area

WHO provides advise on the way forward

Health transition from emergency to recovery /development

For example WHO planned costs for year 2006-2007 was 1,763,000 USD

Health promotion, Disease prevention and control

Reproductive, child and adolescent health

polio vaccination campaign usually provides a window for cease-fire

World Health Organization (WHO)
Avenue Appia 20
Geneva 27 CH-1211
United Nations
More than 10 years
More than 500 million CHF per annum
8000
Avenue Appia 20
Geneva 27 CH-1211
Headquarters

WHO is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system. It is responsible for providing leadership on global health matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating evidence-based policy options, providing technical support to countries and monitoring and assessing health trends. WHO operates in an increasingly complex and rapidly changing landscape. The boundaries of public health action have become blurred, extending into other sectors that influence health opportunities and outcomes. WHO responds to these challenges using a six-point agenda. The six points address two health objectives, two strategic needs, and two operational approaches. The overall performance of WHO will be measured by the impact of its work on women's health and health in Africa. The WHO agenda: 1. Promoting development; 2. Fostering health security; 3. Strengthening health systems; 4. Harnessing research, information and evidence; 5. Enhancing partnerships; 6. Improving performance;

1000
Dr
Margaret Chan
Director General
Nevio Zagaria
Coordinator, Recovery and Transition Programmes, Health Action in Crises

Partnership

Global Health Cluster

Type: 
Informal
Location: 
Other
Other: 
International partnership (based in Geneva)
Main purpose: 
Policy
Description: 

The Global Health Cluster, under the leadership of the World Health Organization, is made up of more than 30 international humanitarian health organizations that have been working together over the past two years to build partnerships and mutual understanding and to develop common approaches to humanitarian health action. The work of the GHC aims to produce:
- Widely endorsed products and services that will stream-line emergency response and increase its predictability
- Greater coherence in health action among the many and varied stakeholders by building partnership and common understanding
- Well managed health information, integrated into an overall information management system that will serve all stakeholders to ensure an evidence-based health response
- A system to rapidly deploy health cluster coordinators, other experts and medical supplies for a more effective and timely response
- A greater focus on building national level capacity to strengthen the preparedness, response and resilience of affected countries.
Relevant peacebuilding sectors: Humanitarian Protection, Humanitarian Assistance, Gender, Physical Infrastructure and reconstruction, Human Rights;

Partner organisations: 
United Nations
Regional organisations
NGOs
Government
Academic
Private Sector

IASC Sub-working Group on Gender

Location: 
Other
Other: 
International partnership (based in New York / Geneva )
Main purpose: 
Policy
Description: 

OCHA, along with the World Health Oranization, has been the co-chair of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Taskforce on gender and humanitarian assistance. In November 2006 the taskforce was converted into a permanent sub-working group of the IASC and OCHA handed over its chairmanship to the United Nations Populations Fund (UNFPA). The sub-working group provides technical support to the IASC and works to ensure gender mainstreaming in the Cluster Approach, and in humanitarian emergency response in general. The group meets regularly and has an annual workplan.

Relevant peacebuilding sectors: Humanitarian Protection, Humanitarian Assistance, Gender, Human Rights;

Partner organisations: 
United Nations
NGOs

United Nations Peacebuilding Commission

Type: 
Formal
Location: 
International Partnership
Main purpose: 
Policy
Description: 

The Peacebuilding Commission (PBC) is a new intergovernmental advisory body of the United Nations that supports peace efforts in countries emerging from conflict, and is a key addition to the capacity of the International Community in the broad peace agenda.

The Peacebuilding Commission plays a unique role in (1) bringing together all of the relevant actors, including international donors, the international financial institutions, national governments, troop contributing countries; (2) marshalling resources and (3) advising on and proposing integrated strategies for post-conflict peacebuilding and recovery and where appropriate, highlighting any gaps that threaten to undermine peace.

Relevant peacebuilding sectors: Humanitarian Protection, Humanitarian Assistance, Human Rights, DDR;

Partner organisations: 
United Nations
Government
Private Sector

Network

Sexual Violence Research Initiative

Type: 
Informal
Type: 
Academic
Main purpose: 
Other
Other: 
Advocacy/campaigning
Geographical scope: 
Other
Other: 
Local (field), based in South Africa
Description: 

The SVRI aims to promote research on sexual violence and generate empirical data that ensures sexual violence is recognized as a priority public health problem.
The SVRI does this by building an experienced and committed network of researchers, policy makers, activists and donors to ensure that the many aspects of sexual violence are addressed from the perspective of different disciplines and cultures.
The SVRI objectives are to:
- Increase awareness of sexual violence as a priority public health problem through evidence based communication and information.
- Strengthen the support and funding base for research on sexual violence.
- Build capacity in sexual violence research.
- Improve knowledge of sexual violence internationally to influence policy and service delivery.

Relevant peacebuilding sectors: Humanitarian Protection, Humanitarian Assistance, Gender, Human Rights;

UN Action Against Sexual Violence In Conflict

Type: 
Informal
Type: 
United Nations / IOs
Main purpose: 
Other
Other: 
Advocacy/campaigning
Geographical scope: 
Geneva
Description: 

UN Action Against Sexual Violence in Conflict (UN Action) unites the work of 12 UN entities with the goal of ending sexual violence in conflict. It is a concerted effort by the UN system to improve coordination and accountability, amplify programming and advocacy, and support national efforts to prevent sexual violence and respond effectively to the needs of survivors.
UN Action HAS THREE MAIN PILLARS:
• Country Level Action: support joint strategy development and programming by UN Country Teams and Peacekeeping Operations, including building operational and technical capacity.
• Advocating for Action: action to raise public awareness and generate political will to address sexual violence as part of a broader campaign to Stop Rape Now.
• Learning by Doing: creating a knowledge hub on the scale of sexual violence in conflict, and effective responses by the UN and partners.
Relevant peacebuilding sectors: Humanitarian Protection, Humanitarian Assistance, Gender, Human Rights;

Inter-agency Working Group on reproductive Health in Crises

Type: 
Informal
Type: 
Academic
Main purpose: 
Project Implementation
Geographical scope: 
Geneva
Description: 

Formerly the Inter-agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Refugee Situations, the IAWG was formed in 1995 to promote access to quality reproductive health care for refugee women and others affected by armed conflict. It was originally comprised of over 30 groups, including UN agencies, universities, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and was led by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations population Fund (UNFPA). The IAWG developed the Reproductive Health in Refugee Situations: An Inter-agency Field Manual for people assisting refugees, outlined the minimum services that must be provided in all disaster settings, designed kits for rapid deployment to aid workers and recognized the need for continued advocacy, funding and technical assistance for reproductive health programs in refugee situations. The IAWG is currently advocating for the institutionalization of reproductive health in crises by supporting regional IAWG networks in the Asia-Pacific and sub-Saharan Africa. In 2004 the IAWG conducted a ten-year global evaluation of reproductive health in conflict-affected settings to identify gaps and constraints so that UN agencies, governments and nongovernmental agencies can better target resources and interventions. Relevant peacebuilding sectors: Humanitarian Protection, Humanitarian Assistance, Gender, Human Rights;